Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Aurora Controller

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Aurora Controller

    I picked up 5 of these for next to nothing before I realized that they're not the good Aurora controllers. Does anyone have any info on the ohm rating of these? They all seem to be functional but a couple could use some clean up. Is there an easy way to crack them open without ruining them? Are they even worth messing with?

    Thanks
    Rick

  • #2
    I think I recall they were marketed as Russkit way back when the earth was flat. You have to cut them apart. The only thing inside is a rheostat and sweeper, so there isn't much risk of damaging anything. You can clean the rheostat with alcohol and maybe bend the sweeper. But, the rheostat gets corroded over time and the sweeper loses resiliency. There's a spring that helps put tension on the sweeper and allows the trigger to return. They seem to last.

    I have no idea what ohm resistance they are, either 60 or 120, I think.
    Last edited by Bal r 14; August 17, 2021, 01:35 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for the info. All of this is making me wish I had gotten a set of 90 ohm Parma resistors before they became nearly impossible to find. If somebody knew how to wind resistors they could make some money right about now.

      Rick

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by padirtfan View Post
        Thanks for the info. All of this is making me wish I had gotten a set of 90 ohm Parma resistors before they became nearly impossible to find. If somebody knew how to wind resistors they could make some money right about now.

        Rick
        Perhaps you need to look for something like these?

        Click image for larger version

Name:	KB_Aurora_Controllers.jpg
Views:	186
Size:	436.5 KB
ID:	115263


        Andre
        Andre Ming
        Poteau, OK

        Comment


        • slothead
          slothead commented
          Editing a comment
          The controllers shown above have nostalgic value, but generally speaking aren't trigger finger controllers to more comfortable, less tiring, and provide higher resolution control? Those look like ideal shelf queens.

        • LAMing
          LAMing commented
          Editing a comment
          Shelf Queens are exactly how they have served since I received them in a batch of slot stuff someone gave me decades ago. EDIT: BTW, all you have to do with most controllers like this (including many other brands) is turn them around and your index fiinger becomes the trigger finger. End of issue.
          Last edited by LAMing; August 18, 2021, 08:52 AM.

      • #5
        Thats actually the later Aurora controller (glued).

        Although the electricals were stamped or crimped, the earlier units could be taken apart (screws).

        Larger in stature also, so a true Russkit-like wand.

        Rated at 45, 60, and 80 ohms if memory serves.
        Last edited by Model Murdering; August 17, 2021, 09:35 PM.

        Comment


        • BIG E
          BIG E commented
          Editing a comment
          I recently found a two wire unit, with the handles molded in red. When I disassembled it for a quick cIean up, I found it has a 35 ohm resistor. I've also got a few of the yellow handled units with 35 ohm resistors, as well as four or five of the dark blue handled 80 ohm units, just for some occasional old school T-Jet FUN! All of these are the earlier AFX type with the AURORA letters and three self tapping screws holding the handles together, so they can be easily serviced. I think I have at least one with a translucent blue handle, and another with a black handle.
          Yeah, I'm a controller junkie! -- Ernie :>)

      • #6
        90 ohm Economy resistors are still available directly from Parma/PSE. I don't think that anyone now offers aftermarket controllers with wire wound resistors. The newer controllers that I have seen have fixed resistors wired in series.
        I would like to know if Parma intends to continue offering wire wound resistors or if they plan on simply selling off their current inventory as they have done with many of their products.

        Comment


        • #7
          Last night I hooked up one of my 45 ohm Parma controllers and it seemed pretty comfortable for oval racing. I’m going to check the ohms on the other 3 with a multi meter and see what they are. I’m pretty sure I have a couple 35 ohm controllers mixed in.

          Comment


          • #8
            So, it appears that I have 2-45 ohm and 2-35 ohm controllers. I'm testing them by hooking up the positive and negative wires to my multimeter and reading the ohms at the very start of the trigger sweep ( I figured the initial reading would be the highest resistance). Does that sound like the proper way to test them? The 45 ohm controllers seem to work well for both the Tjets and Tyco cars and the 35 ohm are pretty much uncontrollable with the Tjets. I'm not sure whether to get 2 more 45 ohm resistors or get 4- 60 ohm resistors and change them all over.

            Rick

            Comment


            • PetesLightKits
              PetesLightKits commented
              Editing a comment
              That works, but if you can get the multimeter test leads touching each end of the resistor that might get you a better value. No need to pull the trigger at all.

          • #9
            Padirtfan, what track voltage are you using? I like a controller with a fast response, so if I was forced to use a resistor controller with a T-Jet it would be 60 ohms. Most people use a 90 ohm controller with T-Jets and the track would be run at 18-20 volts. A few people use a 120 ohm controller with T-Jets. Parma resistors have the ohm value marked on them, although the lettering can be faded. If you can reach both ends of the resistor that would be the best way to measure the ohm value, otherwise the black and white wires would be the ones to use. The black wire goes to the wiper arm and the white wire goes to the full speed end of the resistor.

            Comment


            • #10
              Thanks to RichD and Peteslightkits for the heads up on how to correctly test the resistors. This morning I verified that I have 2- 45 ohm, 1- 35 ohm and 1- 25 ohm controller.
              Rich, I'm running 22 volts, based on your thoughts and what I'm experiencing with the 45 ohm controller I'm going to buy 4- 60 ohm resistors and swap them into my 4 Parma controllers.

              Rick

              Comment


              • #11
                Well Rick, I assume nothing. As long as you're jabbing the probes around, always test both. The resistor, and the controller. It aint all that difficult. Mysterious resistance isnt particularly common, but it isnt unheard of.

                Comment


                • #12
                  It is always a good idea to take resistance measurements across the leads, both for the brake (red and black) and the power (white and black) leads. Often the resistor bands have become dirty or corroded or the wiper button is not making good contact. Better controllers have bypass contacts for the brakes and full speed, those can be dirty or out of adjustment. Even electronic controllers should be checked, at least for brakes and full speed. Recently I built some new HO cars, which seemed to have no brakes, I use a high end electronic controller and turning the brake adjustment all of the way up had little effect. When I checked the brake circuit I read about 200 ohms with full brakes dialed in. I had to open up the controller and polish the contacts, which dropped the reading to 0.3 ohms with full brakes and 103 ohms with the brakes turned down all the way. I also polished the full speed contacts before I put the controller back together.
                  Last edited by RichD; August 21, 2021, 07:03 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #13
                    Originally posted by padirtfan View Post
                    I picked up 5 of these for next to nothing before I realized that they're not the good Aurora controllers. Does anyone have any info on the ohm rating of these? They all seem to be functional but a couple could use some clean up. Is there an easy way to crack them open without ruining them? Are they even worth messing with?

                    Thanks
                    Rick
                    Really not worth your trouble, especially as they are a bit small for adult hands. Keep 'em around for loaners when kids are running cars. If memory serves, they came in 45, 60, and 70 ohm versions, though it's been a while since I've poked around in there with a loupe and bright LED light! The newer black AFX 120 set controllers seem to be work more smoothly, but still suffer from the same small size. There are many controller options available, both basic and very expensive, so just find something that suits your purpose and budget.
                    Hope this helps, and... Enjoy the racing! -- Ernie

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X
                    UA-149438709-1