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Why did I choose 43rd scale ?

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  • walker
    replied
    Defining a manufacturer and motor type seem the best way
    The best way then is to exactly specify what you want
    - can/endbell size
    - brush / brushholder material and design
    - com size, material, timing and treating
    - arm stack length and treatment
    - no. of turns , wire dia, hand or machine wound
    - magnet material and treatment ( polished, shimmed and whatsoever )
    - bearings bronze, sintered bronze, ballraces of what type
    - can closed, with holes, open, strap
    And so on.

    During my active "slotrace life" I could have written a book about the motors of Champion of Chamblee or Trinity or a handful of other C - can - motor - producers and the so - called "specs" as well as not so long ago about the strap motors.

    What a manufacturer produces today may be different tomorrow but still have the same designation. Example - "Fox".

    Roland

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  • Barc 1
    replied
    The minebea Square motors have worked well for me. Not the fastest, but the performance curve and breaking make them one of my favourites for 1/43. Found a new Minebea, same size but turns about 6000 RPM more. A little hotter version with the same braking. . As in real racing braking seems as crucial as top speed.

    My concern on spec motors comes when crossing different manufactures. A 21 K motor from one can be vastly different then one form another. Defining a manufacturer and motor type seem the best way

    Leave a comment:


  • walker
    replied
    Originally posted by Barc 1 View Post
    ......Spec motor racing is kind of an oxymoron. There is so much difference between manufacturers on what they claim and what the motor actually rotates at that I am not sure it matters much anymore.

    Cheers

    Dan

    I don´t agree. I ran classes with spec motors for decades and it always worked without any problem.
    Of course "spec" did not mean the designation only, but the producer, too.
    A "NINCO NC-1" is a Ninco NC-1 by Ninco and not only by its name.
    As well as a Group 12 or 27 has its specs by the no. of turns and the com timing or whatever the race series rules dictate.

    Back to 43rd scale - I have made my aim to find a motor that I will use for all my cars in future. So I am able to compare the cars more realistically, not the capacity and performance of any motor.
    Of course I will still do experiments. But not for working on the motor performance anymore.
    But you are right on one hand.
    An "N 20" isn´t equalling the next one. Each producer has his own specs.

    My "spec motor" now is a motor made from three different ones. It is really "spec".

    Roland

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  • walker
    replied
    Originally posted by pfuetze View Post
    ......i like this scale simply because you have to build nearly everything by yourself.



    Roland

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  • pfuetze
    replied
    i got my first 1/43rd track from my wife in 2001 as a christmas present (Artin set with 2 Citroen) and simply stayed. :-)
    i like this scale simply because you have to build nearly everything by yourself.

    Leave a comment:


  • Barc 1
    replied
    Our stories are similar with respect to 143. You can build scale good running 143 scale nomag cars, and they are just as much fun as their bigger brothers. In fact I kind of like the no motor spec of this scale. ,Buy a motor and run what ever you want.

    Spec motor racing is kind of an oxymoron. There is so much difference between manufacturers on what they claim and what the motor actually rotates at that I am not sure it matters much anymore.

    Cheers

    Dan

    Leave a comment:


  • walker
    started a topic Why did I choose 43rd scale ?

    Why did I choose 43rd scale ?

    My "career" began with 32nd scale cars 1968, after the BSCRA rules. I loved designing and building Flexiboard and Flexi - Iso chassis.
    Later I added Wing cars and G 27, then Group 12. Since the technical and financial expense became higher and higher and on the other hand the successes less and less I quit these classes and got back to my very "love" - 32nd scale real scale models. NINCO started a new era of good looking almost real scale models, and besides that I built my cars from the big amount of kits available.
    Chassis ? Of course the good old Flexi Iso and Flexiboard and their derivates.
    Somewhen here in Germany they began to ban all kind of self - built technique. "Equal chances" was the slogan. ( It is more "equal" to buy five RTR cars and select the best one than building something yourself....)
    At that time I had accidentally discovered the excellent 43rd scale kits form producers like BBR, Renaissance, Provence Moulage, Starter.
    It took me a few hours and the decision was set.
    I switched completely to 43rd scale.
    No, by no means to Carrera or Artin or so !
    I am a scale modeller and my intention was and is not to play on the carpet, but to build realistic scale models.
    So I started searching for my favourite cars as kits.
    I take them, copy the parts I need for my slotcar bodies and resell the still complete and unused kits.
    Chassis are handmade again, no one complains for unfair advantages, everything is after my own specs - I love it !
    I haven´t regretted my decision even one second.
    Our community is small, very slowly growing, but what ? It is worth doing it if you love designing, building and racing.
    The only thing I am missing are real races. Proxies are nice events, but not races.

    Roland

    n.b: In 43rd scale I was able to collect every car that belongs to my favourites. What more can I ask for ?
    Last edited by walker; March 22, 2020, 10:28 AM.
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