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The old wish book. 1967

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  • #16
    Dave, those cars look in between 1/32 and 1/43 to me. Maybe 1/38 or something. Kind of oddball. Good way to get run out of the market.
    Matt B
    So. In
    Crashers

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    • #17
      I pulled out my Lionel catalogs this morning. The 1/32 Scalextric sets were first offered in 1962. Here are the first two pages of the slot car section.

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      • #18
        A very good friend of mine ran the Lionel Visitors Center in Chesterfield. One entire wall was glass display area with historic Lionel items, they did have on display an early Lionel imported Scalextric track set along with original paperwork on the import agreement. They also displayed a couple of later Lionel manufactured HO and 1/32 cars in their original blister packaging. Yes Matt the cars may have been caught between scale but what could one say about many Eldon, Marx and Strombecker offerings during that same time period.
        DAVE - MI, USA

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        • #19
          Actually many of the Strombecker cars were pretty good for scale, interestingly enough. The Eldon cars while lacking detail can be made to look decent with some work.
          Definitely a different class than the Monogram and Revell cars in the US.
          The Lionel cars are in that odd place where scale and detail are both goofy. Kinda a more niche collectable. Not bad or good......just different.
          Come Race at The Trace!
          Timberline Trace International Raceway - SW of Mpls, MN

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          • #20
            I was making a comparison of the early 60's American stock cars by the three manufacturers, take a look at the Strombecker Ford and Pontiac stock cars from that period and the Eldon Chevrolet Impala.

            No doubt as time marched on the scale modeling improved from both Eldon & Strombecker while Lionel dropped their slot car line.
            DAVE - MI, USA

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            • #21
              OMG, I clicked the like button only because there is no LOVE button LOL! Us kids used to wait every year for the Sears catalog to arrive, spent days looking, dreaming, making Christmas lists, still remember the smell of the paper/ink pages.

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              • #22
                One of my friends received the Revell set with the big banked turn as a Christmas present in 1967. It was a real treat racing on his track, compared to my old Eldon track.
                Last edited by bobl; October 9, 2020, 11:32 AM.

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                • #23
                  Thanks for all the photos of the catalog pages, clear and easy to read, too! That was FUN to look at all those again. My buddy had the REVELL set with the Mustang and Camaro and the Hi Bank feature. He's still got it with the original box. Funny how the old department store catalogs didn't always list the manufacturer name in the listings. Those cars were "cheapie" set cars, not like the REVELL 1/32 - 1/24 slot car assembly kits you would buy, build, and race back in the day. The set cars had a basic chassis with an almost rubber feel to the bodies. Very durable, perfect for a set in a toy catalog, I guess.
                  Thanks again! -- Ernie

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                  • #24
                    I always think it is funny to look at those Eldon stock cars and wonder if the mold maker ever saw a real 62 Chevy. I never figured out how you make the roof the wrong size, put it in the wrong place and don't notice you did it!

                    No doubt home racing with Revell, Monogram or the Aurora Ajet 1/32 sets would have gone a long way to reducing the frustration for a lot of kids. I remember the Strombecker set I had with the long shaft motors. They would just spin their crappy tires with all the weight in the front of the car. Again, you wonder if the designers had some good Revell or Monogram cars on the test track when they showed it to the bosses and not those crappy cars that they actually put in the sets. This is the same company that issued nice brass chassis cars.

                    I do think Eldon set cars were a notch better, cheap, but the tires were a bit better and the chassis was a little better.
                    Last edited by mattb; October 9, 2020, 05:37 PM.
                    Matt B
                    So. In
                    Crashers

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                    • #25
                      Matt - I think the Strombecker cars with the long shaft were produced a year or two before Revell and Monogram offered slot cars. Early Strom track with the glued on aluminum rails was a disaster as well. Strom improved their track after a year or two. Cars with an aluminum chassis came out in 64 and were improved again in 66 with the brass pan chassis. Strombecker lagged Revell and Monogram but they did try to stay competitive.

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                      • #26
                        Real early Strom track has glued on brass rails.
                        Matt B
                        So. In
                        Crashers

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