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"Scuttler" by Strombecker...

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  • "Scuttler" by Strombecker...

    Like (I guess) most of you, I participate in more than one scale...and forum, so you may have already read and seen some of this.

    My new interest in 1/24 has lead me to doing some stuff in that larger size, and I'm loving it; Cox, Strombecker, Revell...there's a ton of stuff still available, which is very cool.

    My current project is to try to convert an Aurora Indy roadster model kit into a slot car.

    I purchased this chassis, thinking it might work for this rather narrow application:

    Click image for larger version

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    (In the background you can see parts of the Aurora roadster as well.)

    I was not at all familiar with the "Scuttler" chassis; in fact, when I first got this, I thought it was an Atlas item.

    Until now I thought my smoothest running chassis was the Aurora "A-Jet"; but not any more...this thing is unbelievably smooth and super quiet; I had no idea!

    Makes me wonder why they bothered to use can motors in some of their other cars.

    Learning new stuff literally every day...

    Hope everyone is staying safe.

    Mark in Oregon






  • #2
    Hi Mark, Not that it really makes a lot of difference, but, the motor is (was) called a "Scuttler" not the chassis. They do go just fine (especially for a home track) and the exposed motor magnet does offer some "downforce" on metal rail tracks.
    While variations of open frame "train" motors (particularly the Pittman 196's) were used in club racing into the late 60's, in commercial raceways, they were pretty much replaced by the far better performing "can" motors as early as the mid 60's.

    As far as running smooth/quiet,..you are lucky, those stamped steel Crown gears were mostly hideous,....with the rare one being quite good.

    Most manufactures went the "can" motor route, not only as they performed better, but, at the rate they were being produced by the mid 60's, they were more economical to stick into kits/RTR's.

    Please post pics. of your build/progress.

    Cheers
    Chris Walker

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    • #3
      Cool project Mark!

      Zack

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      • #4
        The Scuttler was Strombecker's version of the Pittman DC196, DC 196A and DC196B motors. Those motors were small enough to power cars that I ran on my A.C. Glibert 1/43rd track, but I also used one in a 1/24th commercial raceway car in 1965. Those types of motors had Alnico magnets which could get demagnetized by heat, vibration and even dynamic braking, most shops had a zapper on hand in case your magnets need to be re-magnetized. If you took the magnets out of the motor they would loose strength and if you went to a store that sold magnets the Alnico magnets needed to have a keeper or they would also loose strength. I expect that the problems that I mentioned were part of the reason for the switch to motors with ceramic magnets.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by chrisguyw View Post
          Hi Mark,

          1. Not that it really makes a lot of difference, but, the motor is (was) called a "Scuttler" not the chassis.


          2. While variations of open frame "train" motors (particularly the Pittman 196's) were used in club racing into the late 60's, in commercial raceways, they were pretty much replaced by the far better performing "can" motors as early as the mid 60's.


          3. Please post pics. of your build/progress.

          Cheers
          Chris Walker
          Hello Chris

          1: Got it; thanks.

          2: As having used quite a few Pittman motors back in my HO scale model railroading days, I guess I shouldn't be surprised by this one...

          3: Have gotten this far as of this morning:

          Click image for larger version

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          Took a lot of trimming, cutting, etc. to get the body to slip on over the chassis: I'm there now and will soon begin to work on the body in earnest.

          Am also waiting on delivery of some longer axles; and I've got a basket-case Cox F1 BRM on the way as well.

          Fun stuff, this...I've never experienced 1/24 scale before this year; have done (3) other cars, and I'm having a blast.

          Mark in Oregon

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