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1/32 Home Racing NYModified IN!

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  • 1/32 Home Racing NYModified IN!

    Just in for testing. Going to thrash this baby as the owner dictated

    First thoughts? KICK ASS.

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    Now something is missing...hehe. Broke my own rule of PHOTOS first and action second!
    -Harry


  • #2
    Oh you lucky dog I’ll bet right now that thing flys
    Dave
    Peterborough Ont
    CANADA

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    • #3
      Super
      Matt B
      So. In
      Crashers

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      • #4
        Glad it arrived in it's case and it is one the track - that is what this car is about - it isn't a brass "hammer", but think of it as a plastic "hammer". . . You can't scratch the paint and you can't scratch the decals - because there are none.

        And the bars are repairable if you bang it around - BTW you did a great job - you tore one off right away!

        You can remove the bar from the chassis and hit it with the iron to solderit back together, or if you were attending a race night and you needed it fix it right away before the next round, you could use heat sinks like a bunch of alligator clips on the bars between the chassis and the solder point, and deftly touch the iron to solder it back in place.

        DEFTLY - because it could melt the chassis, but I am happy to say it works, that is, if you use the heat sinks, and are DEFT.

        Or you could just run a single bar - Keep it simple.

        But the big thing is, this was made to be repairable and something that could be worked on. My goal was to match the performance of modern home racing plastic chassis car like a Scalextric or Carerra.

        This body replicates the car Ryan Preece used during the World Series at New Smyrna this year, 2021 - Pretty incredible run from starting 37th, dead last, working his way through the field and winning the race.

        The video is pretty cool to watch. It takes about 31 minutes before he takes the lead. He is so far back in the field it takes the camera bout 16 minutes before you even really see him - there were a lot of modifieds on the track.



        I was impressed enough that I decided to work up the car as a 1/32 Home Racing NY Modified Body.





        Last edited by Vintage 1/24; April 19, 2021, 01:27 PM.

        NYMODIFIEDS.COM

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        • #5
          Cool video that’s like my oval you can really click off the laps and every once in a while chaos ensues
          Dave
          Peterborough Ont
          CANADA

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          • #6
            OOOOOOH YEEEEEEEAH...PLEASE GET SOME VIDEO UP OF THAT SWEEEEEEEEEETA$$ RIDE DOING LAPS!!!!
            TOM...HOME RACING GOO GOO!!!
            Warren, Ohio

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            • #7
              Originally posted by HomeRacingWorld View Post
              Just in for testing. Going to thrash this baby as the owner dictated
              I didn't make it clear - you are the owner now!

              I am just the builder . . .

              I may tweak the design - considering feedback.


              NYMODIFIEDS.COM

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              • #8
                SCHAAAAAAAAAAAAAWING...THAT IS AWESOME OF YOU V1/24!!!!
                TOM...HOME RACING GOO GOO!!!
                Warren, Ohio

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                • #9
                  The video!

                  -Harry

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                  • #10
                    Thanks for the video and feedback. A bunch of us oval guys have been following everything about NYMODIFIEDS venture into 1:32 scale cars. I'm a dirt oval guy and can see that chassis setup working out nicely under some printed and folded dirt modified bodies.

                    Personally, I think slower is more realistic and 'better', so I'd likely be fine with the motor as tested or something similar. Anyone know what the stats are on the SCX motor used?

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                    • #11
                      One thing about the SCX motors is that they have "real" brushes that are similar to commercial track motors.

                      That means, the more the break in and seat fully, the more performance you can get.

                      In the case of the RX44, this one bench tested at 14,750 RPM @12 VDC

                      This is a common speed for the SCX motors without the "B" designation behind it.

                      Example: the common RX42 was an average of 14-15K. The RX42B had averages of 18-19 k.

                      -Harry

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                      • Fathead59
                        Fathead59 commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Just a question about the SCX motors , with they be stamped someplace on the motor with the RX42 or the RX42B ? The reason why I am asking is because I have a few SCX chassis that I am using for builds .

                      • Fathead59
                        Fathead59 commented
                        Editing a comment
                        And I am sorry about the last comment , I hadn't seen that you had changed out the motors

                    • #12
                      Personally, I think slower is more realistic and 'better', so I'd likely be fine with the motor as tested or something similar
                      So let's talk about this?

                      As you saw in the video, the model ran very well. Was it a screamer? No. Was it FUN to drive? Yes.

                      It's all personal preference when it comes to most all things slot cars. Some cannot get enough speed...where some tune for the driving experience.

                      The main problem with some slot cars today is that the motor released with the car is simply too much for the platform to handle. Chatter, vibrations, etc are not always attributed to inferior running gear. It is sometimes that you simply have too much for the platform to handle. The ridiculous slimcan motors in the Scalextric Legends and Mini come to mind.

                      I am starting with the Predator 18K motor as the first change. Normally, we run the 21K Piranha in our Showdown, but this is not an all brass model. I am curious to see the times with this motor compared to the Showdown models.

                      Click image for larger version

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                      Bottom line is, if I like it? I will keep it.
                      -Harry

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                      • slothead
                        slothead commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Personal preference is always the ultimate judge of what is 'better'. Slower is best for me as a solo racer because my goal is cars that are competitive regarding lap times for simulated racing. I think it's easier to tune a slower slow car to get it closer to the class average.

                        For realism cars in different classes should have different average speeds. I mount Lindberg '49 Ford and '53 Chevy bodies on Artin chassis for an 'ol skool stockers class and mount areodynamic modern dirt modified bodies on custom built chassis using higher powered motors and big silicone over foam tires. There's a huge difference in speed and handling between these types of cars, but they have close racing within each class.

                    • #13
                      Interesting concept. Bet the Predator motor will wake it up a bit. The stiffeners in the chassis are a great idea for 3d chassis. These could open up a whole new genre of racing. Nice work on the car, and good review.
                      Scott.....War Eagle River......Tampa, Florida, USA
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                      • #14
                        Harry - thanks for taking the time to put together the video and testing this thing hands-on!

                        The thing that separates the 'toy' car from the 'good' car is the serviceability.

                        Like vintage commercial cars - the ability to remove/install/change a motor, change a gear, change a tire, and the fact that the chassis resists bending or breaking, that is what makes it a more substantial object.

                        So even though I was making a plastic chassis home track car I held the idea of an adjustable and serviceable car.

                        I typically race 40-50k motors but here I wanted to use a mild motor to better match the performance of a home racing plastic chassis type car.

                        I would have guessed 12,500 rpm out of that SCX, and I did break it in on the bench a little before installing - so almost 15k is actually not that bad. Again, thanks for actually testing it on your rig.

                        I was impressed with the construction of the SCX motor with the serviceable brushes and springs. It looks like a motor that a hobbyist could fool with and take apart. Reminds me a little bit of the commercial style 16Ds etc. - so it seemed to fit right in.


                        Speaking of fitting in, right off I notice the Predator engine swap used the horizontal bolt motor mount holes, while the SCX used the vertical mounting holes. This is exactly what I was aiming at - a racer or a club/group could run whatever they need in this chassis. So I built that into the motor mount.

                        I am curious to see how it runs with the 18k and/or 21k motor swap.

                        Also - Looking at your picture of the motor swap above, make sure to check your axle spacers before you hit the track, the thin ones go on the left and the right side uses the thick ones. I also noticed it in the video, it looked like the spacers were flipped/swapped on the front axle. It was probably just posed for a picture, but if this home made plastic car is going to go up against real brass builds it is going to need everything it can get.

                        Speaking of spacers, you could use the same spacers on all four corners (the chassis comes with them) and see if it can get around the road course. I know it's offset a little with the asymmetrical chassis design, but it may be okay running clockwise on the road course.

                        Since I sent you the car I added a gusset and I made the set screw bosses a little heavier, but other than that it seems like it is pretty much done - but I am still paying attention and listening.

                        Thanks for the hands on testing - I will be watching this space.
                        Last edited by Vintage 1/24; April 28, 2021, 07:33 AM.

                        NYMODIFIEDS.COM

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                        • #15
                          Awesome video and review Harry...looks like a winner and keeper!!!!
                          TOM...HOME RACING GOO GOO!!!
                          Warren, Ohio

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