Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Is there such a thing as a wheel-stander chassis...?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Is there such a thing as a wheel-stander chassis...?

    A friend of mine has a new build idea and he's wanting to know if anyone makes/sells a chassis/kit in 1/24 for wheel-standing drag racing...?

  • #2
    I remember The 60's "Little Red Wagon" slot car that had a chassis where the body did a wheelie? I watched a kid destroy his brand new one doing a wheelie before going under an overpass at the local department store track when I was a youth..
    Allan

    Comment


    • Beast Lee
      Beast Lee commented
      Editing a comment
      I remember them as well... Must have been too funny watching that kid destroy his...

  • #3
    The company BZ back in the day made the Little Red Wagon that were wheel standers. I may be wrong but I remember Mark Thomas built some wheelstanders in 1/32 with scratchbuilt drop arms. Must have been over 10 years ago. Anything is possible if you build it yourself. 😀

    Comment


    • Beast Lee
      Beast Lee commented
      Editing a comment
      Indeed... He was hoping someone offered a commercial chassis...

  • #4
    For those who have never seen one, or for those who have forgotten...............

    The BZ "Little Red Wagon."........the end of the video clearly shows why these were only happy on a drag strip


    PS I do not know of any currently available 1/24 "Wheelie" chassis, (someone chime in and prove me wrong) but there are folks scratchbuilding them.

    Cheers
    Chris Walker


    Last edited by chrisguyw; November 19, 2021, 05:13 PM.

    Comment


    • Beast Lee
      Beast Lee commented
      Editing a comment
      Hahaha... Yep, that thing doesn't like to corner...

  • #5
    Back in the sixties a lot of RTR cars had drop arms where you could go all the way down the straightaway doing a wheelie. Today you'll have to build yourself one.

    The drop arm was invented by Alfred C. Snicklefritz, the great grandson of Herman P. Finklemeyer who invented the guide pin. He got the idea from watching The Little Red Wagon at his local drag strip.

    Legends of Slot Car Racing 2

    Alfred C. Snicklefritz

    While researching the story of Herman I came upon the legend of Alfred C. Snicklefritz a great grandson of Herman’s. Little Hermie married and had a daughter named Regina Rae who married Clyde Snicklefritz. Together they had Alfred who was also big into slot car racing and had a profound contribution to the sport. One day while playing with his slot cars Alfred (about 12 years old at the time) decided to play demolition derby. He switched the lead wires on one of his cars so it would run in the opposite direction, and set it and another car at each end of the straightaway. To get the real effect of the collision he laid down next to the track with his face about 10 inches away and pulled the trigger. Alfred (being just a kid) didn’t take into account the force of the impact that two cars with brass chassis and hard plastic bodies would have. When they hit, both cars shattered sending pieces of plastic flying everywhere. As luck would have it, one of the pieces hit Alfred in the right eye cutting the retina thus changing his life and the history of slot car racing forever.

    As of the printing of The Story Behind The Legends, (Dec. 2003) Alfred C. Snicklefritz is still alive and has been known to appear at slot car raceways in the Midwest. Alfred doesn’t race anymore. With the new technology in chassis design the drop arm is now obsolete. This along with the fact that Alfred is almost sixty years old and the vision in his good eye is fading makes it impossible for him to compete. Now for the legend of

    Alfred C. Snicklefritz

    It is commonly believed that the drop arm used so much in slot car racing in the 60's was originally invented because of the humps in the straight-aways on many of the earlier tracks. This couldn't be further from the truth. The drop arm was originally invented by a one eyed man named Alfred C. Snicklefritz, the great grandson of Herman P. Finklemeyer.

    Having only one eye, Alfred had no depth perception. Every time he put his or someone elses car on the track he would either drop it from about six inches high or slam it real hard onto the track. Either way he was tired of breaking his and worse yet someone elses car. He deduced that by dropping the guide pin down to where he could actually see it go into the slot would enable him to known exactly how far above the track he was holding the car.

    Some of his earlier attempts had a long post on the guide pin that would slide up and down through a hole in the chassis. It worked but looked a little ridiculous going down the track with a big post coming up through the hood of the car. Another problem with this concept was the extra lead wire needed to allow the post to extend down. When the pin was in the up position the extra wire would hang down and get caught under the chassis thus de-slotting the car.

    One Sunday afternoon Alfred decided to go to the local drag strip to watch the show. While walking around in the pits he noticed a Funny Car with the entire body raised up in front to allow the mechanics to work on the motor. He thought why wouldn't this work for me. Holding onto the body he could see exactly when the chassis was touching the track. His hunch was right. His new pivital point body mounting system worked like a charm. At home on his test block Alfred was able to set the car into the slot everytime without doing any damage to it. All excited, Alfred headed for the local raceway to show-off his new creation.

    With everyone watching Alfred gracefully set his car on the track. They were all amazed because they had seen him destroy so many cars in the past. Alfred was extremely elated until he pulled the trigger on the controller. Instead of the car screaming down the track the body lifted up in the front catching the air and the car de-slotted. The whole place erupted in laughter and Alfred was never so embarrassed in his life. He picked up his car, placed it in his box and left.

    Several months later Alfred ( still to embarrassed to go back to the track ) went back to the drag strip. Alfred watched all day as the cars raced down the track two by two. The racing was almost over and Alfred was preparing to leave when the announcer, said that they had a special treat for everyone. It was then that Alfred saw a small red van truck named the “Little Red Wagon” being towed to the starting line. What could be so great about this he wondered and decided to stay and see. As soon as the van truck got the green light the front tires came off the ground and stayed off the ground all the way down the 1/4 mile. It was something no one had ever seen before.

    It was then that Alfred realized that if he just pivoted the guide pin from the rear of the car and not the whole chassis that his problem was solved. A few days later Alfred headed for the local slot car track with his new Rear Pivotal Point Gravity Powered Guidance System ( drop arm ) and the rest is history. Thus making Alfred Cornelius Snicklefritz a true legend of slot car racing.
    Butch Dunaway
    Oxford, Ohio

    Comment


    • Beast Lee
      Beast Lee commented
      Editing a comment
      Wow, that's quite the story...

    • Pappy
      Pappy commented
      Editing a comment
      Yeah, and it's all bull that I made up. LOL I just figured slot car racing needed some legends so I made up the story about Herman P. Finklemeyer and Alfred C. Snicklefritz. Lumber Jacks have Paul Bunyan and Babe the blue ox and we have Herman and Alfred.

  • #6
    You can go to Ebay and buy any number of 1/24 side winder frames for 36D motors. Any of these are pretty easy to add a spring to the drop arm and make them "wheelie". The best frames for this seem to be Kalkar, Checkered Flag and others that have two side rails that fit against the motor and a couple bolts that keep the chassis spread to the front. These are not hard to find and don't cost much. There is also an available body and decals made by DominicP... who runs a raceway in the northeast. I've done a few of these bodies and they look pretty original. if you are serious about actually building a replica, call Ed Sourbeck and see what he can supply you with. Pretty sure he has some of that style chassis in his old stock. REH has motors or just asking here would probably turn up one.

    The LRW in front is original, the rear one is a replica.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	P1010037.jpg
Views:	179
Size:	166.7 KB
ID:	132771
    Attached Files
    Matt B
    So. In
    Crashers

    Comment


    • Beast Lee
      Beast Lee commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks Matt, now I want one... Hahaha...

  • #7
    Some of the scratchbuilt wheelstanders I've seen, have had motors installed behind the chassis' rear axle for better weight transfer. Photos may exist on the internet some place, but I don't know where. Some of the slot car drag racing sites have left the net.

    Comment


    • Beast Lee
      Beast Lee commented
      Editing a comment
      I've seen some of those as well...

  • #8
    Wasn't there a post on the forum about drop down arms on a chassis for dragsters ? Because I was thinking about building one of my own

    Comment


    • Fathead59
      Fathead59 commented
      Editing a comment
      that is , I was going to do it at one time

    • Beast Lee
      Beast Lee commented
      Editing a comment
      The more I read, the more I need...

  • #9
    In the Crap car proxy there is a wheel standing Thunderbird in 1/32 scale. It’s got a drop arm chassis, owner built I think.

    Comment


    • Beast Lee
      Beast Lee commented
      Editing a comment
      I'll have to take a look...
Working...
X
UA-149438709-1