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Current Status of 3D Scanning Capabilities

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  • Current Status of 3D Scanning Capabilities

    Is anyone currently scanning existing parts and or bodies and then printing new copies? My search found one thread on scanning but it dried up back in February. I’ve seen some sites for 3D scanning using a smart phone but I’m not too familiar with it yet. I’m curious as to what the HRW community has been doing in the last year.

    Thank you,

    Bruce

  • #2
    If you want highly accurate scanning be prepared to spend £££££'s
    No app in the world is going to convert a phone into an accurate scanner, even then you'll have to learn how to use software to clean it up to something a 3D slicer could use.

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    • #3
      So, is everyone doing their 3D printing from existing commercially available files? Is anyone doing their own scanning?

      thanks,

      Bruce

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      • #4
        Bodyshell files I either buy or download, chassis are easy to design from scratch in comparison. There are some who take a bodyshell file and modify it with software like Blender.

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        • #5
          Some bodies are available for free on Thingiverse. Any solid model can be hollowed out to make a shell pretty easily. There are some good shell files available for under $10 on a few sites depending on what sort of cars you like.

          As Kevan says, chassis are pretty easy.
          Come Race at The Trace!
          Timberline Trace International Raceway - SW of Mpls, MN

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          • #6
            For the kind of accuracy we need I believe you'll need a 3D scanner that works with a turntable. Lots of them available, but I doubt you'll find anything worthwhile for under a US kilobuck. A number of them I've seen online are well north of that, up to US$5,000 or so.

            There may be maker clubs that have useful 3D scanning capabilities, very likely kludged and tweaked together by someone with considerable talent and spare time.

            As noted above, if you are looking at slotcar components you're far better off designing them in 3D CAD. Bodies, however, are natural candidates for scanning due to their complex, blended geometries.

            We are still very early days in scanning for hobby purposes. It is common for scans to require considerable editing for patching and trimming. Skill, training, patience and determination required.

            Five or ten years further on I expect things will be very different. Easier and cheaper in all directions. Those of us who lived through the evolution of computers -- from punched cards to laptops -- know the drill.

            Ed Bianchi

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            • #7
              Ed, thank you so much for your post. That is exactly the information I was looking for. Chippymanm thanks for the info on the shell files for solid models. That is something to look into. I appreciate the discussion. I’ve got some homework to do on software...

              Bruce

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              • #8
                The Nissan GTP is one example.....
                https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3252641

                That is a shell I made in TinkerCAD by hollowing out a solid model that is up on Thingiverse. Lots of cars are available if you do that.

                Now....I need a front valence for my Monogram Lola GT. That one I am going to have to design/print/revise in several iterations since I can't just scan it......yet.
                Come Race at The Trace!
                Timberline Trace International Raceway - SW of Mpls, MN

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                • #9
                  I've written extensively on the subject of scanning on the former HRW forums. I owned a NextEngine 3d scanner in 2005. It was $2500 at that time. It had a turntable and worked very well, but I had a steep learning curve with Solidworks at the time. Additionally, the 3d printing service back then was about $350 per body. It required a ton of hand finishing, but gave us the 1967 Cougar and 1971 Datsun 510. My Cougar version as a scan of an accurate 1:24 model was dang near perfect when compared to the Scalextric version. The Datsun is wonderful.

                  The story is here, but the pics are long gone as my site is offline: https://www.homeracingworld.us/viewt...139741#p139741

                  I sold it years ago, and have gone the at-home 3d print option using either free or purchased bodies. These are images of the original scans.

                  Click image for larger version  Name:	cougarrpm (Medium).jpg Views:	0 Size:	31.4 KB ID:	61754
                  Click image for larger version  Name:	510scan02.jpg Views:	0 Size:	5.6 KB ID:	61755

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                  • slothead
                    slothead commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Dave - I have 5 Trans Am cars based on your bodies - 2 Cougars, 2 Javelins, and a Firebird. They are mounted on Scalextric chassis. I bought and built them long before the Scalextric versions were available. Thank you for what you added to my enjoyment of slot cars.

                • #10
                  Individual ownership of 3D printers may be affordable and make sense, but quality scanners might best be made available on a local or regional basis. Such as at libraries, vocational schools, or colleges. I got my most recent wood track CNC routed at the University of Maine for a reasonable cost. The private college I retired from opened a lab that offers laser etching and cutting, 3D printing, virtual reality modeling, and quad copter drones for students, faculty, staff, and members of the community to access. You have to submit a project plan to be reviewed and go through the training process to use the equipment but it does make high quality processes available that individuals otherwise would not have access to.

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                  • #11
                    [QUOTE=As Kevan says, chassis are pretty easy.[/QUOTE]

                    Are there any tutorials on making a chassis? I have limited skills in 3D modeling (use Tinkercad currently) but can get around basic stuff pretty well. My issue with designing a chassis is getting the body mount posts correct and lining the pod up with the chassis and wheelbase. I don't wan't to hijack this thread, maybe someone can send me a PM with any helpful info.
                    Thanks!
                    Jamie

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                    • #12
                      Hi Jamie,
                      I put up a post awhile ago about how I assemble the "3pc adjustable wheelbase" chassis that is posted on Thingiverse. Pretty straightforward. I mostly mount new body posts but if you don't want to do that a caliper will be your best friend.
                      Come Race at The Trace!
                      Timberline Trace International Raceway - SW of Mpls, MN

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                      • #13
                        Originally posted by JamieB View Post

                        Are there any tutorials on making a chassis? I have limited skills in 3D modeling (use Tinkercad currently) but can get around basic stuff pretty well. My issue with designing a chassis is getting the body mount posts correct and lining the pod up with the chassis and wheelbase. I don't wan't to hijack this thread, maybe someone can send me a PM with any helpful info.
                        Thanks!
                        Jamie
                        I've not seen any, I just translate what's in my head onto my pc then tweak it once it's in 3D. I've not done a design right first time yet, I'm always seeing improvements in my head. Most improvements that need doing appear AFTER the print finishes...i.e. why-the-hell-didn't-I-see-that

                        I just love designing them, it's become a hobby all of it's own, you may find the same. Just because you don't know how now doesn't mean you can't learn going forward. I watched a lot of youtube before deciding on Fusion360, I couldn't see the point learning something inherently restricted to start with then learn all over again how to do the same with something else...Saying that though, I probably don't use over 95% of Fusion

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                        • JamieB
                          JamieB commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I finish up school on December 12th (but who's counting? lol) and will have more free time on my hands starting next year. I'll look into learning one of the more involved 3D programs out there for sure. I can see modeling and printing turning into its own hobby for me as well.

                      • #14
                        Hey folks, I really appreciate the discussion. Looks like I have lots of homework to do. I just upgraded to a new computer that should actually handle some of this software. We are moving right after Christmas so while I will hopefully have some time to research stuff I don’t see anything really happening until we get settled. I will need to get the track up and running plus all the other new house stuff.

                        again, thanks for the thoughtful discussion. I’ll continue to follow this 3D forum.

                        Bruce

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                        • #15
                          Carry a pen and notebook around to jot down ideas, I've been thinking about my latest design today and had a major idea change so out comes the pen and notebook for when I get home to start putting the idea into 3D CAD.

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