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  • Basic motor maintenance question.

    I’m still new at this, have been running my cars about a year now on some of them. What if anything should be done for maintenance on stock motors? Ie, Scalextric, SCX, Carrera etc. I’ve done a drop of oil on the shaft but that’s it. Thanks for the tips.

  • #2
    Unless you open the can which is easy with most FC130's there's not much you can do.
    ​​​​​​Motors with holes in the can (NSR, SlotIt) you can at least spray motor cleaner in or drop it in an ultrasonic cleaner.
    Kevan - Isle of Man
    Life is like a box of Slot cars...🚓🚗🚚🚜

    Comment


    • Michael Squier
      Michael Squier commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks, that’s kind of what I was guessing. So, run em till they die which is probably a fairly long time anyway.

  • #3
    If you're oiling the bearings try to avoid the end bell bearing unless it's the smallest possible amount.
    Kevan - Isle of Man
    Life is like a box of Slot cars...🚓🚗🚚🚜

    Comment


    • #4
      I ruined a few Carrera motors by oiling them. Destroyed the commutator. I was able to resuscitate a few with contact cleaner and patience, but they were never the same. I would not recommend oiling motors. They come with some grease on the bearings already.

      Comment


      • #5
        There's the proof, oiling the end bell will eventually get on the comm, oiling the can bearing however is perfectly safe.
        Kevan - Isle of Man
        Life is like a box of Slot cars...🚓🚗🚚🚜

        Comment


        • #6
          Run them until they slow down or squeal then one drop on each end and away you go if there’s any body left
          Dave
          Peterborough Ont
          CANADA

          Comment


          • #7
            Originally posted by RexCadral View Post
            I would not recommend oiling motors. They come with some grease on the bearings already.

            ​​​​​​Just out of curiosity, which motors come with grease on the bushings????,.....I have yet to see one.

            Most motors come with "sintered" bronze bushings which will hold oil, not grease..............regardless, getting oil/voodoo drops etc. on any modern motors' comm. is not the hot tip for long term longevity, or, performance.

            Oiling (very sparingly, and not too frequently ) both the can end and endbell oilites is more than acceptable,...............frequent oiling, and anything more than the teeniest tiniest drop should be avoided.

            PS anytime a motor is fully cleaned (particularly if submerged /run in liquid) the oilites should be lightly re oiled, as the oilites may have run dry.


            Cheers
            Chris Walker
            Last edited by chrisguyw; December 20, 2021, 11:37 AM.

            Comment


            • chappyman66
              chappyman66 commented
              Editing a comment
              What Chris said.

          • #8
            It's my experience that slot car motors last a very long time unless abused in some way, such as getting them very overheated. As a kid I ran solo 6 hour endurance races, usually with my Cox Ford GT40 and it would probably still run if I knew what happened to it. At the time all I had for maintenance was some 3-in-1 oil which I applied from time to time. I still have Parma Womp-Womp motors still going after 4 decades.

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            • #9
              Thanks, great info. FYI when I do oil my motor I only do it when they are new and just a drop. I guess I don’t really need to worry about them then.
              I suppose it’s really another topic but is there any benefit, or process of breaking in a new stock motor? I just run mine on the track in the car, but I do notice some seem to run better after a few hours of track time.

              Comment


              • #10
                Originally posted by Michael Squier View Post
                I suppose it’s really another topic but is there any benefit, or process of breaking in a new stock motor? I just run mine on the track in the car, but I do notice some seem to run better after a few hours of track time.

                Hello Michael, The main purpose/benefit of "Breaking in" a motor is to have the motor brushes wear a bit so that the inner radius of the motor brush conforms to the circumference of the commutator...........this reduces arching, which can pit the comm. plates (not all that good), and it improves conductivity, and peak performance longevity.

                Our modern toy car motors do not contain the most precision bits and pieces, and assembly, is done very quickly to keep costs down, so it is very common to find motor brushes that do not conform well to the comm. Additionally, many motors contain motor brushes with little to no inner radius, which compounds the issue. That said, for the relatively low RPM and low current draw of these motors, breaking them in is of considerably less value than with the higher end (faster) motors found in the commercial track type cars.

                While I know many racers that do as you do (break them in by running them in on track), generally, the better/more competitive racers will break in their motors prior to installing them in their cars.

                The age old method of motor break in (I recall it starting in the mid 70's , and was/is used by the best pro commercial track racers ) is as follows..............only do this with motors that have a hole in the can on one or both sides !!

                1/ Fill a glass half full of water............the water acts as a lubricant to reduce arching, and it will wash away any motor brush particles, preventing them from clogging the slots between the comm. plates

                2/ Hook the motor leads to an adjustable power supply

                3/ Immerse the motor, and run it in its intended direction of rotation, at 2/3 volts for 10/15 minutes............you want the motor to turn slowly enough that arching is not seen,....again arching pits the comm., which is to be avoided.

                4/ Remove the motor, and while it is still spinning, use a hair dryer/compressed air to dry the motor

                5/ A drop (tiny drop) of oil on both motor bushings, and you are good to go.

                You will get varying degrees of performance improvement, (depending on the initial brush assembly alignment) , but, you motor should perform more consistently for a longer period of time.

                Cheers
                Chris Walker
                Last edited by chrisguyw; December 20, 2021, 04:00 PM.

                Comment


                • Michael Squier
                  Michael Squier commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Thank you Chris, that’s one of the best descriptions I’ve read yet. I’ve read many different ways usually using some mystery mix of fluids and overnite run ins. I like simple, your way sounds simple to me. A little late for most of my cars now but I’m sure there will be more new motors in the future.

              • #11
                I run my motors in water at 5 volts for 10 minutes to break them in and when I notice they are getting sluggish. As Chris mentioned, I attempt to dry them out and add a drop of oil. It has significantly improved the performance of some motors I thought were shot, actually better than new. Don't worry real much if you can't dry the motor. Just hold it in different directions as it's spinning.

                Comment


                • Michael Squier
                  Michael Squier commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Well then maybe I will give a few of them a spin in the water bath and see if I notice any difference. I probably won’t, but it still might last longer.
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