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Has anyone tried a G10 frame?

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  • Has anyone tried a G10 frame?

    I have some bodies I would like to make new frames and running gear for. In the old days (60s - 70s) I raced 1/24 and scratch built frames from brass. I started fiddling with a brass anglewinder frame in 1/32 and came to the conclusion it may not be the best choice. I flew RC helicopters and quads for a number of years and I used a lot of G10. It's light, strong and pretty easy to work with. So, I was wondering if anyone has tried building a slot car frame with G10?

  • #2
    Lots have folks have built slotcar chassis using G10 (and variants) over the years.........if you do a google image search you will find several.

    Obviously unlike brass/wire/steel, G10 must be either screwed/bolted/glued together, and with the many plastic, 3d, and aluminum/metal chassis available for 1/32 cars, G10 has not really found a strong following, either among scratchbuilders or manufacturers.........that said, don't be afraid to give one a go,............always good to see someone trying something a little out of the norm.

    Just curious, why have you decided against brass/wire ??

    Cheers
    Chris Walker

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    • #3
      There is a guy an the slotblog forum that has made a bunch of g10 chassis. He goes by Alchemist, his name is Ernie.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by chrisguyw View Post
        Lots have folks have built slotcar chassis using G10 (and variants) over the years.........if you do a google image search you will find several.

        Obviously unlike brass/wire/steel, G10 must be either screwed/bolted/glued together, and with the many plastic, 3d, and aluminum/metal chassis available for 1/32 cars, G10 has not really found a strong following, either among scratchbuilders or manufacturers.........that said, don't be afraid to give one a go,............always good to see someone trying something a little out of the norm.

        Just curious, why have you decided against brass/wire ??

        Cheers
        Chris Walker
        A brass guide post seems like a bad idea because the potential for contacting the braid wires that stick out where the wires attach to the guide seems pretty high. But the biggest issue is that with an anglewinder configuration, one side of the motor protrudes almost to the side of the car, making a straight piece of brass tubing that connects from the front to the rear wheels impossible, unless you go under or over the motor, neither of which is desirable. I tried several more complex designs that would work, but they add weight. I am finding smaller, lighter cars work a lot better on my track, so extra weight is not desirable.

        I would buy the anglewinder cradle/ motor mount and fabricate a G10 frame to hold it. That would take care of the hardest part. Guide post and front wheel mounts would be relatively easy.
        Last edited by Bal r 14; May 8, 2021, 04:52 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Bal r 14 View Post

          A brass guide post seems like a bad idea because the potential for contacting the braid wires that stick out where the wires attach to the guide seems pretty high. But the biggest issue is that with an anglewinder configuration, one side of the motor protrudes almost to the side of the car, making a straight piece of brass tubing that connects from the front to the rear wheels impossible, unless you go under or over the motor, neither of which is desirable. I tried several more complex designs that would work, but they add weight. I am finding smaller, lighter cars work a lot better on my track, so extra weight is not desirable.
          Over the years more 1/24 and 1/32 cars have had brass/steel etc. guide posts than all the plastic cars put together,...........with no issues, and today, all of the better chassis builders still use brass/steel for the guide mounts. Similarly all of the commercial track metal RTR chassis use metal guide tongues/guide posts.

          As far as making a light weight anglewinder chassis without having the main rails over/under the motor (which none of the decent ones do) ...........please look on google images to find thousands !!
          The first were generally attributed to Roy Moody and Gene Husting in 1967/68.



          This may be a bit more complicated than you need................you could certainly bypass some of the hinge movements,...and,..by using either thinner or cut out pans, you can make them very light indeed. For that matter you could just use the center wire section and have a feather weight chassis.

          You can also buy pre cut/drilled motor bracket plates, which make the job even easier.

          Cheers
          Chris Walker

          Click image for larger version  Name:	post-622-0-17122400-1463942297.jpg Views:	1 Size:	195.3 KB ID:	97730

          Click image for larger version  Name:	post-622-0-29755000-1463941288.jpg Views:	1 Size:	147.5 KB ID:	97731
          Last edited by chrisguyw; May 8, 2021, 09:30 PM.

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          • #6
            Every one I have looked at was too wide or there wasn't enough room for the large can motor, which is within 1/8" from the side of the body.

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