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Scale Car Garage - Mold making & Casting Pt. 1

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  • Scale Car Garage - Mold making & Casting Pt. 1

    Please join me as I illustrate how to make molds and cast parts at Scale Car Garage!



    Any and all comments are more than welcomed!

    Thanks
    😀
    John

  • #2
    Hi John,
    Thanks for showing your method of molding and casting. I'm looking forward to this series , kudos to you!!!

    I enjoy all your videos, and appreciate your "Mr. Rogers neighborhood" style of slot car YT fun! 😉

    Some of your work was blocked by the camera angle, it's distance and your hands?
    On the figures and smaller parts molding clay work, are you aiming for inserting the part to about 1/2 depth?
    Best Regards,
    Jack



    Comment


    • #3
      Jack, thanks so much for the wonderful compliments!

      Apologies for my blocking some of the work from the camera, I'll be more aware of this in the future!

      Yes, the smaller parts have a 'clean clay' base of 3/4 of an inch. I err on the side of thicker walls rather than thinner for my molds as I'll be casting these parts under pressure and the added thickness adds to the longevity of the mold.

      I hope this helps!

      Thanks so much for watching, posting and subscribing! I really appreciate it!

      Comment


      • #4
        If you cast under pressure, you know you must also pour your silicone and let it cure under pressure?
        Matt B
        So. In
        Crashers

        Comment


        • #5
          I agree!!

          "I enjoy all your videos, and appreciate your "Mr. Rogers neighborhood" style of slot car YT fun! 😉"
          TOM...HOME RACING GOO GOO!!!
          Warren, Ohio

          Comment


          • #6
            Mattb, thanks so much for watching, posting and subscribing!

            When pouring silicone molds, the curing is done at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, which is why it is called "RTV" silicone. "Room Temperature Vulcanization".

            As I will illustrate (hopefully) in part 2, the silicone is purchased as a part "A" and a part "B" which have to be combined in a 10 to 1 ratio by weight.

            Once combined, the resulting mixture is placed in a vacuum chamber before pouring into the mold(s).

            The basic rule of thumb is:

            Resin casting is done under pressure (to remove bubbles or air).

            Silicone is placed in a vacuum chamber (to remove bubbles or air from the mixing process) before the pouring of molds.

            A bit of a peek into part 2!

            I hope this helps!

            Broman62, thanks so much for your post and your most valued support!

            John

            Comment


            • #7
              I can't wait for part two, Be great for HO scale bodies

              You are great
              Austin
              Merrimack, NH

              Comment


              • #8
                Austin, thanks so much for your wonderful compliment!

                Yes! An actual cornucopia for HO if you are willing to dismantle any Hot Wheel you want to have as a slot car!!

                Thanks so much for watching, posting and subscribing!

                I really appreciate it!
                😀
                John

                Comment


                • #9
                  John, I've been casting since 1980's. I didn't want guys to see your great video and not realize there is a lot more equipment involved in pressure casting then just buying some resin and rubber. Last week I was able to order Alumilite High Strength rubber and Quick Set resin for $19.99 each with free shipping online. Not sure if those prices are still good.

                  Here are some bodies I've made without pressure, just simple molds and slush casting. I made 2 part molds for bodies that I thought others would want, but for my own use, I just do a slush cast in an open mold. The Shadow started as a printed body Paul upsized for me and then I did some finish work and made a mold. All my stuff is 1/24.

                  I did a web page back in the 80's about simple resin casting and it is still floating around the internet. Currently a guy in England has it on his website. It is a very basic open mold process. It was my first attempts at casting and opened up a simp e new phase of the modeling hobby.
                  Matt B
                  So. In
                  Crashers

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Matt, you are absolutely correct, to achieve the best results possible, molding and casting is a bit 'equipment intensive'.

                    However, the equipment does not have to be expensive (coming in part 2) or complex and gives professional results.

                    Slush molds are a great method of creating items, it is quick and it gives more than acceptable results.

                    However, like most things, there are always methods to adopt in any endevour that increase the level of results and bring even more satisfaction to an activity!

                    As I said at the beginning of the episode, the method(s) that I'm illustrating are not the only way to make molds and cast parts!

                    Thank you so very much for showing your method which, as your photos show, produced stunning cars that you should be very proud of!!

                    Thanks so much!
                    😀
                    John

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I loved the video, looking forward to the next installment.

                      I used to cast professionally (technically I still do, but mostly prototyping now) and you've covered the process well.

                      Not sure if you're aware of the reason for Kleen Klay, but it's because platinum cure silicones don't react well to latex or sulphur. It inhibits the cure. Most non hardening clays were sulphur based back in the day, but recently there are quite a few non sulphur, non hardening clays on the market if someone can't find Kleen Klay easily or has another option on hand.

                      Some of today's silicones and resins can be used without vacuum if careful, although it's always a good idea. I stopped using pressure years ago, I find vacuum much more useful for getting resin in voids. I cast a lot of 1/35 figures and even with pressure, getting into spots like finger tips were always a problem with about a 50% failure rate, until I started vacuuming the resin in the mold. Instead of squeezing bubbles towards the center, it simply removes them. Haven't looked back and bubbles are a rare thing. Only problem to work around is molds have to be designed to handle the expansion.

                      If you do use pressure, you 'll need to pressurize the mold as well. If not, when you put the resin under pressure that the mold wasn't cast under, you could get distortion.

                      Lastly, you can make the mother molds (or mold box) much smaller. I'd go bankrupt if I made them that big. Over the last few years I've been using a 3D printer to make mother molds so very tight to the master, which also supports the mold while casting or in storage.

                      Hope that helps.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks so much!

                        I really appreciate your feedback as I'm just a rank amateur aspiring to competence.

                        Yes, the reason for using Kleen Klay was explained to me at length and it has served me well!

                        I actually cast my molds under pressure in a pressure pot, most parts are cast at 20 PSI while the wheels we make are cast at 60 PSI. One of the reasons for our mold box size!

                        We've had a very good pull rate with about 2 to 5 percent errors, usually these occur at the initial use of the molds before proper flow paths are created.

                        Wow, you 3D print as well!!

                        More to come, I'm working on part two!

                        Thanks again
                        😀
                        John

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Ausf: Interesting info - And I am paying attention because other guys talk about 1/32 *figures* and you are talking about 1/35 *fingers*.

                          Kitmen: Will be watching these and would recommend them for anyone into the hobby. Thanks!

                          NYMODIFIEDS.COM

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                          • #14
                            Thanks so much for your very wonderful compliments and you recommendation!

                            I really appreciate your continued support!
                            😀
                            John

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