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Shortening a Pioneer chassis

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  • slothead
    commented on 's reply
    If you have a hobby shop around consider balsa wood strips instead of popsicle sticks. Balsa wood is very light weight, files easily to size, and accepts screws nicely after drilling a small pilot hole. I glue a few strips together to get the desired thickness (height) and use double sided foam tape to secure to the body.

  • slothead
    commented on 's reply
    Building a few Bow Ties or Mopars now and then is good for the soul, after all the Blue Ovals are gonna need them to beat up on.

  • one32
    replied
    Roger that fathead59
    Yeah, every car I do, I learn new tricks, so I think your advice is great.

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  • Fathead59
    replied
    one32 , get all of the mistakes out on the Chevys , this way when you do your Fords they will be mistake free . And I am a Hot Rod fan , I do not have one particular brand of car maker that I like over the others . As long as it is fast and looks good .

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  • one32
    replied
    Fathead59,
    The "shortening" method will surely work both ways. I have a couple chassis's set up to do just that. Stretch
    I already have the brass cut for the first one. I'm gonna take Chrisguys advice and do the second one with styrene tube, and piano wire.
    Chris says the chassis should flex a little bit. I thought just the opposite. It makes sense to have some " give" in the chassis now that I think about it. (still learning)
    I have 2 resin 65 malibu chevelle's I got off 873chris on ebay a while back. I plan on using the bumpers, and grills off a diecast 65 malibu to give it a little shine .
    I will post progress with photos very soon.
    Here I am a Ford man, and building everything but Fords!!!!!!!!! Go figure

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  • Wobble
    replied
    Originally posted by one32 View Post
    Click image for larger version

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ID:	27266 The chassis fits the ole cuda pretty good. Now I gotta figure a good way to mount it to the body. I may just use post. Any suggestions?
    Using 3 posts is my preferred mounting method, 2 in the front and one centre rear and it's not too hard to change the chassis mount position.

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  • Fathead59
    replied
    I have a few resin bodies . And the way I plan on mounting them is with popsicle sticks epoxy to the bodies . I have brass inserts also .

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  • Fathead59
    replied
    But with this I will know you will be able to shorten them also

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  • Fathead59
    replied
    I am following this thread because I plan on doing basically the same thing , but I plan on stretching the chassis using strips of flat brass .

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  • one32
    replied
    Click image for larger version

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ID:	27266 The chassis fits the ole cuda pretty good. Now I gotta figure a good way to mount it to the body. I may just use post. Any suggestions?

    Leave a comment:


  • williamg
    replied
    coming along nice
    Good to see kit bashing is still done. We need more projects seen in the works.

    Leave a comment:


  • one32
    replied
    Great advice. Thanks again

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  • chrisguyw
    replied
    Good job Eric !!................on your next chassis, while in the jig, put some equal sized gears/wheels etc. on the left and right of each axle. prior to gluing .......this will ensure that both front and rear axles are on the same plane, and parallel with the track surface.......do not assume that resting the bottom of the chassis on a flat surface will result in the axles being parallel with the jig surface.

    Cheers
    Chris Walker

    Leave a comment:


  • one32
    replied
    By the way, After taking the video tour of the famous skunk works shop, I'm glad to see that Mr Harry, is a fan of Harbor Freight. I think for modeling, the tools you need are good enough. I do have the little cut off saw for cutting brass, and it does work great. The nice thing is, if it breaks, buy another one.

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  • one32
    replied
    Ok, so i have the square tube epoxied in.
    I let it set for 24 hours, and then cut on the band saw.
    I cleaned and de burred the ends , and took a small rat tail file to the inside of the tube. By the way, I only made 1 cut. I then went to the grinder, and fine tuned the distance i needed.
    Then, moved on to the inner tube that will support the outer tube. I put a little super glue. in the larger tube to help hold the smaller tube. I made the inner tube as long as possible. I measured from post to post it was spot on.
    For the Barracuda, the amount removed from a Pioneer mustang chassis is the small piece that seperates the 2 magnet slots Click image for larger version

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    Then put frog tape under chassis, and threw some more epoxy to it. I'm planning on a digital car, so I put the magnet in before I epoxied the chassis back together.
    Attached Files

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