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  • stronger brake pot

    I have found that I need more brake with these heavy scratch built brass chassis cars I have been building and running. All my controllers only go to 10 max on the brake setting on the pot. I'm looking for some that go from 0 to 12 for the little extra stopping force. Also if anybody can point me to anybody that may have prop wash in gallon jugs. Thanks for the help in advance.
    THE other Vancouver aka Vancouver Washington across the river from keep Portland weird....
    Member NASTE (Northwest Association of Slot Track Enthusiasts)

  • #2
    I have found that the simplest solution to this problem is to just print 1 o to 12 scale on vinyl decal paper and stick this over the original scale. Really helps increase the brake power. Good luck finding prop wash in small quantities like gallon jugs. The air museum I work at deals with it in cubic meter loads. Maybe an R/C model store has little bitty amounts.
    cheers
    Scott

    Comment


    • Fast Co.
      Fast Co. commented
      Editing a comment
      Spoken like a true military man.

  • #3
    Ours all go to 11.
    Mike
    Clover Leaf Racing 7746 Clyde Road Fenton MI 48430 U.S.A. 313-473-SLOT
    web site: https://cloverleafracing.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/cloverleafracing
    YouTube Chanel: http://www.youtube.com/user/CLR132slots?feature=watch

    Comment


    • Fast Co.
      Fast Co. commented
      Editing a comment
      You must source them from the same place that Spinal Tap gets their amps.

    • Mikeinclover
      Mikeinclover commented
      Editing a comment
      Well yeah.

    • jaws
      jaws commented
      Editing a comment
      I bought one of Mike's brake pots and my car is much easier to drive now. I bought a Dilfalco controller online and it had a 100-ohm pot that I replaced with a 25-ohm pot. The new pot allowed me to adjust the controller so I could control the brakes over a wider range of adjustment. Thanks Mike

  • #4
    11 you say that might work have a part number?
    THE other Vancouver aka Vancouver Washington across the river from keep Portland weird....
    Member NASTE (Northwest Association of Slot Track Enthusiasts)

    Comment


    • #5
      A brake control pot can only reduce the amount of brakes, so unless there is something wrong with the one that you are using replacing it will make no difference. It is possible that the pot has some resistance, even when the brake is turned up to the max. You can check that by connecting an ohm meter between the controller's red and black connections, hopefully it will read zero. Possibly the brake contacts are not making properly, or the pot is dirty.

      Comment


      • Fast Co.
        Fast Co. commented
        Editing a comment
        Yeah, but Mike's goes to 11.

    • #6
      Get one of Mike's pots, turn it all the way to 11 and see if it reads less than 0 ohms!

      Comment


      • Fast Co.
        Fast Co. commented
        Editing a comment
        I was being facetious with my comments above because the op seemed to be in jest.

    • #7
      Doc
      All kidding aside,
      I agree with you regarding the braking issue, My NSR cars almost stop on a mark yet the Revo cars stop 2 or 3 feet from the mark. I am running a Brand New Difalco DD300.
      Maybe getting in contact with DiFalco and see if there is a way to make more braking power? I know that the brakes use power to stop the motor momentarily, A long time ago when "I raced 1/24 in the USRA circuit " I made my own brakes using a potentiometer, due to the fact that I was using a Parma external resistor controller and it did not have much brakes but who used them at the time when if the car did not brake when you needed it just lay down so more glue!!!!! I didn't use glue I drove my car to 2nd and 3rd places using the external brake pot.
      Ok It is early here in jersey so sorry for the blah blah blah not enough COFFEE!!!!!
      Click image for larger version

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      Using a simple project box 25ohm pot and some screws etc and have controllable braking I will try to test it out today, haven't used this since the 80's and see how it works!

      Marty
      T.R. Raceway
      Toms River NJ

      Comment


      • #8
        Regarding JCIS4ME's statement about his NSR stopping much quicker than his Revoslot, the difference is the motor. The NSR motor has very strong braking characteristics, while the Revoslot motor is much weaker.
        Dickie Pearson
        Canterbury, NH

        HOST - Home Operated Slot Tracks
        MSR - Main Street Racing

        Comment


        • #9
          Dickie
          I should have been more clear on the difference in the NSR VS REVO SLOT Both have the same gearing and H&R 14k motor, what I was getting at was the lighter NSR stops quicker than the heavier Revo!
          Marty

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          • Mikeinclover
            Mikeinclover commented
            Editing a comment
            The weight alone is a big difference. The Revo Slot weights quite a bit more then a NSR so it would take more breaks to slow it.

        • #10
          Revoslot cars are considerably heavier than most RTR 1/32nd cars. If you rely on regular dynamic brakes a particular motor will only generate so much braking force. If full brake is not enough you could change to a lower (higher numeric) gear ratio, but that might make the car more difficult to drive and would also reduce the top speed. You could try to reduce the weight of the car, possibly by replacing a plastic interior with a vacuum formed one. Another option is to find a motor that has more brakes.
          The ultimate solution is to apply a reverse voltage when the controller is in the off position. Back in the mid '60s I put a 6 volt lantern battery in the brake circuit. I included an old Aurora steering wheel HO controller in the circuit so I could adjust the brakes. If the brakes were turned up too high the car would want to run backwards after it came to a stop. That type of braking was quickly outlawed.

          Comment


          • #11
            The only way to decrease the resistance in the brake circuit would be to wire in an electro-mechanical relay to close the circuit. That relay would be normally closed, powered open by the speed control circuit of the controller.

            The reduction in resistance should be minimal unless the wiring in your controller is defective, so I doubt adding this relay would be worth the trouble. Also, I am a bit concerned that the interaction between the power circuit and the braking circuit might be an issue.

            I think Rich has the right answer here -- change the gearing.

            And yes, back in the dark ages I too played with 'power brakes'. Thanks for the trip down memory lane Rich.
            Ed Bianchi
            York Pennsylvania USA

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            • #12
              https://youtu.be/V7nrva6xiAc

              Johnr

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              • Fast Co.
                Fast Co. commented
                Editing a comment
                ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

            • #13
              For a given motor and tires, a heavier car needs different gearing just due to the weight - simple physics.
              The other option is to change motors. Back in the day, shimming the magnets closer to the arm (or replacing the magnets with stronger ones) and putting on higher tension brush springs were all ways to increase braking effect but that's not as practical with the modern home car motors.
              Come Race at The Trace!
              Timberline Trace International Raceway - SW of Mpls, MN
              https://cults3d.com/en/users/chappyman662/creations

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