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  • Crossovers, Are they good or bad?

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    My first thought was to create our track with equal lane length and inside/outside curves.
    Purpose being to make everything as equal for the racers as possible.
    Not being a big fan of figure 8 racing I'm left with the crossovers or 'x' tracks.
    However I notice that this becomes problematic with crashes.

    With the Round Robin racing format I'm starting to wonder if equal lane length is worth the trouble?

    What is your opinion on crossovers?

    Thank you.
    Joe.


  • #2
    I thought that too, but one lane will always appear to be better than the other anyway. Agree with not using the crossover track or any other track that puts the cars in harms way. I have some crossovers only to use in the pit lane on a digital setup...

    Just my $0.02 worth....

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    • #3
      Depends on what value you place on your cars.

      Randy
      Randy C
      Grindrod B.C.
      Canada

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      • #4
        A crossover, with an angle like what you have shown, functions similar to how corners with tight pinch points work. Some people like that it requires some strategy, while others consider it a nuisance. I tried a crossover and it didn't work as well as I would like. But, I can see where it would work with some track design ideas I have, with a bit of tweaking. If you look at the crossover design used here, it actually works quite well: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YcZonfjHM2w.

        I tried something like that on an analog track and I think it would work on a large track if the crossovers were in the right place. On a small track, it sucks. You already have limited places to pass and this just limits it more. I pretty much have to try every idea and concept I see. Most turn out badly. I'm on my 4th completed track less than a year, plus 4 more aborted attempts due to poor design concepts.... like a bullring.
        Last edited by Bal r 14; July 19, 2022, 12:59 PM.

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        • #5
          If you are going to run heats then equal lane length is really not an issue. Each car/driver will spend the same amount of time in each lane. That's what's important.

          Also, imo a small difference in lap length keeps things interesting. As cars race in different lanes there will be some corners where some cars are quicker or slower than others and cars will come together, separate, and come together again as they race around the track. I'm coming to you from an analog, routed track but the principles are the same on plastic.
          Team SCANC
          Woodland Trace Raceway - SlotZuka - Bent Tree Raceway
          OFI - Buena Vista Motorsports Park - Slotkins Glen
          Leadfinger Raceway

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          • #6
            Crossovers suck. Voltage controls on each lane will equalize times on any track.
            Matt B
            So. In
            Crashers

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            • #7
              Just use lane rotation - everyone races on each lane once.
              PetesLightKits

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              • BIG E
                BIG E commented
                Editing a comment
                Exactly... Ernie

            • #8
              An odd number of crossovers on a two lane track turns it into one long single lane track which is perfect for Rally.
              Kevan - Isle of Man
              Life is like a box of Slot cars...πŸš“πŸš—πŸššπŸšœ

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              • #9
                Crossovers and other factors such as narrowing the distance between the slots in corners do create situations were passing is restricted. If this makes passing too difficult then yes, it's problematic. But if it merely increases the need to be strategic then it could be seen as introducing a realistic factor into slot car racing that might not otherwise exist on that track or in those races. In full scale racing it's often said that catching up to a car and passing it are totally different. We've all watched races where 'traffic' inhibited passing and either slowed or limited a faster car's progress to the lead. Getting caught behind lapped or slower cars has contributed to the outcomes of many races. That's a natural part of racing.

                Despite the fact many slot car racers just want to squeeze the controller and go as fast as possible from the start to finish of a race, a need to be strategic isn't necessarily a bad thing. Once in the lead it's often intelligent to back off a bit and preserve the position more so than extend the lead meaninglessly. Rather than longer races often won by many laps, a series of shorter heats may provide a better overall racing experience.

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                • #10
                  Yup. Lane rotation solves everything. Race the track first, then the cars that come near. Skip putting cars in more harms way
                  Tony
                  ... Hobbit Racing...
                  ...Tampa, FL, USA...
                  Hobbit Racing on YouTube @
                  https://youtube.com/channel/UClHtBAa7HLzBnTmEG_qUf5A

                  https://www.facebook.com/hobbitracingpark/

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                  • #11
                    I race digital at home mostly against ghost cars and have utilized two crossover sections. This added strategy to my racing and I have found that certain cars can travel over these sections more effortlessly than others. Higher center of gravity cars can wobble or derail easier if they take the crossover too quickly. This causes me to think about my driving more as I have to ease off the throttle occasionally or watch for oncoming traffic. Yes, the occasional unexpected accident occurs but isn’t that what occurs in racing? Modern cars can sustain an occasional crash remarkably well. It’s o.k. Consider this a vote for thumbs up on crossovers.

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                    • #12
                      Originally posted by dkfuball View Post
                      I race digital at home mostly against ghost cars and have utilized two crossover sections. This added strategy to my racing and I have found that certain cars can travel over these sections more effortlessly than others. Higher center of gravity cars can wobble or derail easier if they take the crossover too quickly. This causes me to think about my driving more as I have to ease off the throttle occasionally or watch for oncoming traffic. Yes, the occasional unexpected accident occurs but isn’t that what occurs in racing? Modern cars can sustain an occasional crash remarkably well. It’s o.k. Consider this a vote for thumbs up on crossovers.
                      Crossover bends get rid of this problem as you're slowing anyway and it's still just a bend rather than a wiggle.
                      Kevan - Isle of Man
                      Life is like a box of Slot cars...πŸš“πŸš—πŸššπŸšœ

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                      • #13
                        Thanks everyone for your input.
                        I have been leaning toward leaving them out and with the input here I believe I will.
                        I purchased a bunch of inexpensive cars with the kids in mind to start with so car damage is not a big factor.
                        But the interruption the accidents can cause is what I'm hoping to avoid.

                        I purchased a used Carrera Evolution track with a few missing and a few additional pieces.
                        I've got 38' I think. This is the track I designed using the track that I have.
                        The crossovers make the lanes perfectly equal.

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                        Thanks again.
                        Joe.

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                        • #14
                          Since I was 15 years old I have never used a crossover on any track I built, 1/64, 1/43 or 1/32. I do usually build a track with some form of figure 8. If you are clever enough it won't have to really look like a figure 8. All of my lanes on my mdf track are 55' long but even so it is true that they don't produce identical lap times even when run alone. We race a format called european rotation which assures that a driver is not stuck next to the same competitor all through the race. Everybody gets to race every lane.

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                          • Bal r 14
                            Bal r 14 commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Who you are next to on the track is often more significant than the track.

                        • #15
                          Easiest way to accomplish what you wanted to do is try the figure eight option. Kids like over/under passes so it should be a hit. Looks like you have enough track to try a few different track layouts too.

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