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Tired Of Searching, Need Monogram Help Now

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  • Tired Of Searching, Need Monogram Help Now

    I have learned to sit my displayed slot cars on top of a thin foam rectangle, with a cutout for the guide flag. This works well, as it prevents the flat spot issue with rubber tires. It gets some the weight of the car off the tires, and cushions the bottom of the tires. Never actually had this problem with urethane and silicone tires, but I put the foam pad under all displayed slot cars. Yesterday, I discovered one of my few remaining cars without the foam pad under it, my prized Monogram model of the Penske/Donohue CanAm Lola T70, had flat spotted worse than any situation I've ever seen ! The driver side of the car's rear tire is beginning to flat spot, but The Front Tire, is TOTALLY flat spotted, all the way to The Rim ! Like, Melted !
    Here is my problem : I have Paul Gage rear tires already in my order cart, at Slot Car Corner, but I can't find The Front Tires, which I REALLY need ! Would like a urethane front tire, so I won't have to deal with this again. Also, the front tires on this model are smaller, so What Size ?? Recent scratch builds lead me to the second part of my problem/question : Is there some kind of a "Variety Bag", of different sized pairs of Front Tires, that can be purchased from somewhere ? I have run out of leftover/scrap front tires, which ended up serving me well, on different projects.

  • #2
    If you can turn down the wheel's center flange height to 1mm the PGT-20105 will fit the fronts. Otherwise it is a one off size and I have nothing to fit.
    Paul Gage Urethane Slot Car Tires
    1-10 Ellesmere Ave
    Winnipeg, MB. R2M 0G3
    1-204-299-3795
    [email protected]
    http://www.ebaystores.ca/paulsslotcarshop
    also available from Slot Car Corner, Carrera Slots, LEB Hobbies.

    Comment


    • 6666hotrod
      6666hotrod commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you, SO Much !!

  • #3
    I did a quick search for Rev. Mono Lola T70 tires in all my North American and European go to retailers, and unfortunately, all are out of stock (and will not be restocked),.......so,..........either you modify your existing front wheels as Paul suggested, or, replace your front wheels with some alu. versions, which will give you tons of tire options. If the car is worth it to you, you could always find a used one on the auction sites, but, you will run the risk of having the tires "go off" as yours have. Several of the RTR manufacturers, (Rev.Mono., Carrera, Fly etc.) are somewhat renowned for "melting" tires.

    As far as "variety bags" of front tires, I have never seen any, just but lots and make your own variety bags

    Cheers
    Chris Walker

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    • #4
      6666hotrod:

      Can't help you with your current issues, but going forward, I suggest placing the cars on upturned plastic milk jug caps. Work great and they will suspend all four tires completely off the table surface.
      Andre Ming
      Poteau, OK

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      • #5
        Do you know the diameter and width of the tires you need and what kind of center ridge or flange? I have lots of junk tires.

        Comment


        • #6
          I had the fronts on a Monogram McLaren go rock hard on me. I used Slot It 1088 Classic Front Tires as replacements.
          I just tried them on a Lola. OD was spot on, but if I were to use them, I’d sand the wheel ridge down as the tire had a bit of a crown to it.

          Comment


          • #7
            With those Monogram and also Carrera tyres sometimes sitting them on an elevated platform makes no difference. The tyres leech oil and either go rock hard or melt. Frustrating to say the least.
            Dangermouse to the rescue.

            Comment


            • #8
              Well, I was going to suggest you contact Paul Gage, but that’s done and dusted. As I have one of the Monogram T70s, I’m thinking I might need to set myself up similarly.

              Another resource worth trying is this guy in the UK (https://sandbachslotcars.co.uk). I needed to find tires for a couple of old Scalextric cars recently and he was able to help. I emailed him info about my cars and he replied with what I needed to buy.

              Good luck! I have a soft spot for Revell-Monogram cars.

              Comment


              • #9
                Thanks, to all of you Hobbyist's !!

                Comment


                • #10
                  Originally posted by GT40 Racer (DM) View Post
                  With those Monogram and also Carrera tyres sometimes sitting them on an elevated platform makes no difference. The tyres leech oil and either go rock hard or melt. Frustrating to say the least.
                  How long does it take for this malady to happen?

                  Reason: I had a leftover Carerra '57 Chevy racer that I purchased as soon as it was released years and years ago. The car is still equipped with the tires that came on it. i.e. OEM.

                  I just examined the tires again, and the only thing that is apparent is where the rear tires have been sitting and making contact with the shelf. As can be seen, at that contact point, there is evidence that something was going on. However, the front tires (always suspended by the guide flag when sitting of course) are still fresh and pliable with zero evidence of any thing amiss. Here's a pic I just snapped to illustrate:


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                  SO... what truly activates this phenomenon and why the disparity between the front/rear tires?

                  Based on the above, I still feel that suspension (no load) helps the tires.


                  Andre Ming
                  Poteau, OK

                  Comment


                  • RvE
                    RvE commented
                    Editing a comment
                    The hardening/drying out of Carrera tires seems to be hit or miss. I dont know what 'activates' this. I have some Carrera cars with tires that are 4+ years old, and the rear tires held up well, and other new cars that dried out after 1 year. I do agree, this seems less pronounced on the fronts, but they too dry out - but its less of a problem on the front wheels!
                    Note - as odd as it sounds, if you apply light household oil to the tires (and work it in with your fingertips) early in the hardening stage, it seems to restore the stock tires and add life. I assume the oil is "moisturizing" the rubber and thus restoring it. I have gotten into the habit of doing this at the first sign of drying out on Carrera tires - both front and rears. Once my rear ties are gone, I simply replace them with Paul Gage tires. This whole Carrera tires problem is a common headache and its odd since my Scalextric tires have at least double the life span of Carrera.

                  • LAMing
                    LAMing commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Well, my original thought was to prevent flat spots, nothing more, just avoid flat spots. It wasn't until I truly studied the Carerra tires that I saw there was some type of reaction exactly where the tire was in contact with the bare plywood shelf. Has me baffled, wondered if others had some ideas as to the "why" of it.

                • #11
                  My understanding is the rubber compound used in some brands is variable. The actual ingredients in the rubber recipe are not consistent, We have seen many instances where three tires on a car are fine and one will go bad. This suggests that the tires were from different batches or possibly that the batch is not thoroughly mixed. I imaging this is all a consequence of reducing manufacturing costs.

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                  • #12
                    I store my cars on their side, in almost airtight boxes, and this never happens. Just be careful about what the downside is touching. No Foam!

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                    • #13

                      ​​​​​​If you h Click image for larger version  Name:	16567561946825776243629899630976.jpg Views:	4 Size:	4.25 MB ID:	166197 Click image for larger version  Name:	16567564243094274892473041473874.jpg Views:	4 Size:	4.09 MB ID:	166198 ave access to a 3d printer or know someone, get some of these made, can be made to fit most types of cars and chassis, great to keep tires from flat spot's.
                      Last edited by Rastas; July 2, 2022, 05:12 AM.

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                      • #14
                        While the 3d printed stand works well (I did print a few), I decided it was better for the environment to reuse old bottle caps rather than having them end-up in a landfill. Juice caps work great for 1/32 cars, milk caps a bit better for 1/24.

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                        • LAMing
                          LAMing commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Love the job you did on the little Eldon T-Bird! Looks great.

                      • #15
                        The maker of another brand of slot cars posted about his experiences with the tires that he used. Some companies have their own plant in China, other companies use a contract maker. The company that makes the bodies and chassis does not make the tires, another contract operation does that and the tire maker does not make the rubber, that gets delivered to the tire maker as a melt. Obviously the various contract outfits are looking to reduce costs and often make changes that the company that puts its name on the cars may not be aware of until something has gone wrong. Natural rubber is not a stable material, various things are added to the formulation to stabilize it, add the black color and get the desired Shore value. If the rubber is formulated correctly the tires can last for many years, if not they can turn rock hard or turn to slush in a couple of years. If the tires disintegrate they will release a plasticizer that will attack clear parts and the plinth or track section that the car is sitting on.
                        Last edited by RichD; July 23, 2022, 09:29 PM.

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