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  • ...just curious / motor mounting

    I recently inquired about soldering motors onto JK motor brackets. Something that was in the back of my mind, and I wanted to ask, but didn't :
    Could you get away with bonding a motor onto a JK bracket, with JB Weld (the 5 minute, kwik-weld version) ?? If it would hold, I figure it would
    be a permanent bond. One of the responses to my soldering-the-motor inquiry, actually mentioned JB Welding the motor to the bracket, but didn't elaborate.
    Just for my personal knowledge, I'd like to know, especially since I recently slightly over-tightened a self-tapping motor screw, and it caused the screw-hole in the motor, to now be too large.

  • #2
    I would solder in but jb weld should work. just make sure both surfaces are free of any oils.
    THE other Vancouver aka Vancouver Washington across the river from keep Portland weird....
    Member NASTE (Northwest Association of Slot Track Enthusiasts)

    Comment


    • 6666hotrod
      6666hotrod commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you, and I'm GETTING, the Details !!

  • #3
    If you solder in the motors, it will be much easier to remove and replace them when the time comes.

    If for some reason you wish to glue the motors in, (not sure why you would want to) you could use JB weld, 2 part epoxy, or a rubber toughened CA.

    Cheers
    Chris Walker

    Comment


    • 6666hotrod
      6666hotrod commented
      Editing a comment
      Chris : If you read what I'm saying : I' DON't WANT TO REMOVE a Motor ; ever ! I'm just
      building a slot car, to MY hometrack specs. I have built several cars that are PROXY-specific, "HarryCars", that are legal, but I do make sure to build a few, that I Just Wanna Build, for MY track, experimenting with !! They have kickass motors, and all kind's, of shit ! Just Need A Motor To To Stay Locked Onto The Motor Bracket !!

  • #4
    I have used hot glue to secure the motor. It works well and won't stick to the motor if you wish to remove it. I put down the length of the sides of the motor. I put it on pretty thick. It dampens some noise, too.

    Comment


    • 6666hotrod
      6666hotrod commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks !

    • 6666hotrod
      6666hotrod commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank y'all, much ! And, Chris, I do appreciate you, and the loads of crucial stuff, I'm learning from you. I can be a bit insistent, and stubborn, sometimes. But I DO, have good reasons, for most of my questions. Example : it really threw me, when I screwed a brand new motor, onto a brand new LVJ chassis, but the self-tapping screw, was slightly over-tightened, by me : now The Hole, is too big for any screw ! So, I need to find another way to attach the motor. As much as I'm becoming addicted to scratchbuilding, the one thing I hate about it, Is SOLDERING !! It's always an unpleasant struggle, for me ! Though I do Feel Great, once my 'Builds are finished, and running well ! But for Me, the less soldering that's necessary, the better I Like It ! But, I do, still need to attach a motor onto a chassis/bracket : it would be Just My Luck, to get a great motor that I paid for, too hot, attempting to solder it onto a chassis or bracket : so I thought of JB Weld, which I once actually sealed a Chevrolet Beretta GT radiator with, AND IT WORKED !! So, I had to ask ! You fellow Hobbyist's, are a great community of People !
      Last edited by 6666hotrod; April 26, 2022, 01:10 AM.

    • chrisguyw
      chrisguyw commented
      Editing a comment
      If, as you say, you are becoming "addicted to scratchbuilding", it might be a good idea to practice/improve your soldering skills !!! lol..........it does take a bit of learning (and the correct equipment), but. it will improve both the quality of your chassis' and their look.

      Not sure what type of motor you are installing, but unless you are securing it by the endbell, you should not be using self tapping screws....2mm machine screws are the "standard" for the motors used in the bulk of the hobby these days.

  • #5
    Another great point you make, Chris : I have recently began using a narrower (3/4") Motor Bracket. This is actually dictated to me, by a few recent projects, with unusually narrow width's/tracks.
    But I'm sticking with that 3/4" bracket, 'cause it makes sure all my project's wheels/tires have no problem being contained within The Body !!

    Comment


    • Pappy
      Pappy commented
      Editing a comment
      You hate soldering and you have no intensions of replacing the motor, so you want to glue the motor in with a two part epoxy........So my guess is, when the motor wears out you are going to throw the whole chassis and motor away and solder up a new chassis???? Kinda defeats the purpose of glueing the motor in doesn't it? Don't use self tapping screws for the motor, use the proper screws and I don't think you'll strip them out. https://slotcarcorner.com/collection...ength-panhead# or https://cloverleafracing.com/collect...-10pcs-pkg-scc

  • #6
    You don't need a lot of solder, just a small dab at the top will do it.

    Comment


    • #7
      I don't solder like some of these guys, but I have learned what makes it reliable and easy. Clean work and a hot iron. To get clean work noting beats Stay-Clean flux. I use a Hakko iron, but most any iron will work. It just needs adequate heat and a clean tip. Stayclean made my work 100% better right away and really let solder flow smoothly among all surfaces.
      Click image for larger version

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      Matt B
      So. In
      Crashers

      Comment


      • Mitch58
        Mitch58 commented
        Editing a comment
        You're right, I struggled with soldering for a long time. It turns out the flux I had was crap. I switched and it made all the difference in the world.

    • #8
      Chris and Pappy : I don't intend to make a habit, of gluing motors on. It's just a backup situation, that I'm confronted with, and I do need to have
      the knowledge of what options are possible. I do see, that scratch building Requires, that you learn how to solder, and there is no way around
      that fact ! I know I need to be able to get a worn-out motor off of a chassis, and keep my good chassis (which specifically fits That Car).
      And thanks, also, to myDude, Matt B.

      Comment


      • #9
        Ummm, use the screws to mount and not torq them with you impact driver. I wouldn't want to solder or glue them, and Ima a home track racer too.
        Mike - Galena Ohio

        "When you're back there with the squirrels, you're bound to get your nuts cracked." - Graham Rahal

        https://www.hrwforum.com/forum/hrw-a...gends-bullring

        Comment


        • #10
          Pappy : the screw that I'm calling self-tapping, is That Black Screw, the big-head odd-looking screw, that Smith Scale Speedway sells, to attach motors to LVJ chassis. It goes into that "third hole", the un-threaded hole on mini-can motors with three holes. It is the one and only screw that attaches a motor onto an LVJ chassis. When I screwed to motor onto my latest LVJ project car, I tightened it too much, and now the hole in the motor is too large for any motor screws that I have. So, I need to solder it (but it's the metal chassis, not the brass version), or, most likely, Glue it ! I've seen this same black screw sold by others, as well, and they describe it, as self-tapping. It must be, though, because that third screw hole on mini-can motors, is not the same size as the two horizontal screws, that you normally use. And I know those two screw-holes on most motors, are already tapped !

          Comment


          • chrisguyw
            chrisguyw commented
            Editing a comment
            Those screws are typically called self tapping "Cap Screws",......they have been around for ages, and were used primarily when we used to attach motors to the brackets via the endbell. I still use them on "vintage" builds, to maintain originality, but, whenever I can, I use threaded screws,.....not sure why anyone would still use self tappers, and you certainly don't see them used at any of the better commercial tracks.

        • #11
          Instead of using JB Weld to glue the motor in which might be pulled by the magnets in the motor, you might try painting the end of the motor and the bracket face with CA glue and let it dry completely and then use a cheap regular 5min 2 pack epoxy between the ca painted surfaces to glue the motor in. The ca will help the epoxy bond with the metal but won't bond so well that the motor can't be removed if needed. Also, some of the cheaper epoxys can be softened if need be by soaking in methylated spirits although you might call it something else depending on where you live. Just my 2c worth.
          Bram,
          CHCH NZ

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          • chrisguyw
            chrisguyw commented
            Editing a comment
            6666Hotrod, If you choose to go this way, (again, I do not recommend gluing the motor in) it would be very wise to use a rubberized CA. Non rubberized CA glues have very poor shear strength, and one wall shot could easily crack a join with regular CA.

        • #12
          6666hotrod,

          Try what Mitch and Matt suggest in post's #6 and #7. You'll get your motor in and out in a few seconds and you won't screw-up your motor. Practice makes perfect, keep practicing and you'll make perfect solder joints and enjoy scratch building much more.
          Butch Dunaway
          Oxford, Ohio

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