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  • Womp possibilities, and, .....

    As a recent Scratchbuilding learner, I am curious about something : can a Womp, or Womp-like chassis, possibly be used for building a Scale, 1/32 car/project ?? Just for an at-home racing situation. Ran across a couple of chassis that got me curious about using one as the basis of a Scale racer. Also, I got an gmail that introduced me to Laminated Slot Car Bodies, already painted and cut out ! Made me wonder if there are any Scale bodies available, maybe as an alternative to lexan/clear bodies !! Anyone know about this, and pros and cons ?

  • #2
    If you get a brass Womp frame, you can slice and dice to make most any size chassis you want to fit most any car. Over the years I've had 6-8 come thru here that were cut in half and made longer for 1/24 stock cars. I've had some with the sides trimmed off to fit certain bodies like an old coupe or similar narrow Indy car. Price is up a bit but you can buy the LVJ brass wide, adjustable womp style frame for $15. Yo can get a narrow version for a couple dollars less and a cheaper steel version of both. You can get a Sprintsplus brass frame for $10-$12. Not sure what the wheelbase is, probably 3 or maybe 3 1/2 inches. These are ideal for use as brackets to make a custom frame. You can solder a wider pan under it. You can cut and lengthen it. There is no end to what you can do and it's a good way to get started soldering frames together. I have used all of these frames to build cars either stock or they have been cut and modified.

    Good way to get your feet wet soldering frames.
    Click image for larger version

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    Matt B
    So. In
    Crashers

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    • 6666hotrod
      6666hotrod commented
      Editing a comment
      Really appreciate that, Matt !!

    • 6666hotrod
      6666hotrod commented
      Editing a comment
      Matt : for LVJ Cruiser chassis, what Motor (because it mounts differently than on a JK motor bracket), what Axle Size (I suspect 1/8) and size for Oilites Bushings (maybe 1/4" hole ?)
      Last edited by 6666hotrod; February 11, 2022, 04:28 AM.

  • #3
    The simple answers to your questions are yes. I've built a bunch of modified dirt cars for my oval track using Womp chassis with printed paper bodies. I did this because when I built my routed oval for racing replica cars on the only way to do that was to make them myself and I had Womp chassis left over from my commercial track days.

    Click image for larger version

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    The car on the right above is my version of Jack Johnson's #12A, built on a narrowed and lengthened (3 1/4" wheelbase) Womp chassis. These cars are easy to build and with Daytona Stockers silicone over foam tires are super quick and handle very well.

    If you are interested in modern oval short track cars that mostly have sheet metal bodies you can make your own from paper (I use heavy glossy photo stock with colors and decals printed on) or plastic (styrene sheets) and there are also some available. As for modifying Womp chassis as needed use a Dremel, and install a home track motor that's speed appropriate. Of course you can always go with vacuum formed Womp style bodies for road course cars, but I'm not sure about the variety of realistic bodies available.

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    • #4
      I have made all sorts of stuff using Womps. It's a great basis for a chassis, and relatively cheap, and an easy way to keep everything square and true.

      I have used them to make NASCAR style Asphalt Modifieds using my own laminate bodies. I think I have almost 300 of theses bodies drawn up by now. Like you say they are already "painted" and "decaled" and they weight very very little.

      I have also used Womps as a basis for 1/24 hardbody builds, really just a simple stretch and your are in business.

      NYMODIFIEDS.COM

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      • #5
        I used to race in a 1/32nd scale sprint car series run on a banked oval track. The cars used a Womp chassis that was modified to make it narrower.

        The Womp motor and axle brackets are easily banged out of shape in roughhouse racing. We reinforced the chassis with a U-shaped piece of piano wire soldered to the top of the motor and axle brackets. Another 'U' of piano wire was soldered at the front to reinforce those axle brackets too.

        The size wheels and tires we were restricted to made the ride height of the chassis a bit taller than ideal. So before doing any soldering we bent the back of the chassis up a bit, lowering the chassis overall. That made the drive a bit hypoid (motor shaft and axle not in the same plane), but the car tolerated that okay. Soldering in the piano wire locked everything in place.

        Those little bits of piano wire made the chassis quite rugged. Even a launch off the banking and onto the floor could be sustained without damage.

        For this kind of structural soldering I strongly recommend Stay-Brite brand silver solder and Stay-Clean brand liquid acid flux. Stay-Brite is much stronger than electrical solder, and Stay-Clean is much more powerful than rosin flux. Great products.
        Last edited by HO RacePro; February 11, 2022, 07:38 AM.
        Ed Bianchi
        York Pennsylvania USA

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        • #6
          Any FK motor fits the LVJ with one self tapping allen screw. If you want to use the two threaded holes in the motor, you will have to drill the frame for them. I usually mount with one screw, snug, and solder the top of the car to the frame. The single screw usually holds fine, but it also deforms the can sometimes. A few times I've seen it get the motor bushings out of alignment by bending the can. Also the allen screws are sometimes a tad too long and need the end ground down because they hit the arm inside the motor. Without going to measure, I'd say the oiltes are standard 1/4 X 1/8. You really need to call SCC to get a package together that is everything you need to build a brass car suited to your track.
          Matt B
          So. In
          Crashers

          Comment


          • 6666hotrod
            6666hotrod commented
            Editing a comment
            I'm just now seeing your response : ignore my newer New Topic, and I thank u

        • #7
          This is the problem I was wrestling with over a year ago after buying 8 LVJ chassis and assorted parts (axles, bushings, gears, wheels, & tires) to build a field of sprint cars. At the time I didn't realize the chassis motor mounting holes didn't match the holes in the Piranha motors I'd also purchased. I had a few Professor Motor PMTR1500 Hot Rod motors left over from a lot purchased years ago that fit, but not enough for all the cars so the project has been on hold.

          Ideally I'd like to find a way to mount a thin plate to the LVJ chassis that is then compatible with the Piranha motors. Pipe dream?

          Comment


          • mattb
            mattb commented
            Editing a comment
            I've used the FK180 in all my projects, so I never had a problem. If you have that many frames, you ought to make a drill guide that you can use to just drill mount holes for the short car. Make one guide and then drill all the frames. Lot easier than an adapter plate for each frame. which would also move the motor.

          • chrisguyw
            chrisguyw commented
            Editing a comment
            As Matt points out,...it is far easier to drill 2 holes in the existing motor bracket.

        • #8
          I am just now catching up with responses to my early posts : disregard my newer New Topic. I think I was somewhere, misunderstood, here : I'll just stick to my scratchbuilt "Harry Chassis", as they run well. Just wanted to try something, with what looked like an Easy To Work With, chassis.

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          • #9
            Worth giving the Womp build a try - mattb has it right, you can secure the motor with the one self taping screw and it works fine.

            The original Womp was setup for the 16d style vertical motor mounts, before the modern era. Parma stuff is no longer available but MidAmerica now sells these, so you can get the original style Womp again.

            H&R did a Womp knock off version called the "Stinger", and since it was recently created it is setup for the modern mini can motors as well, and has holes for both vertical and horizontal mounts. So that is worth looking at.

            Unfortunately the LVJ has only the vertical mounts, but like mattb said, the one screw will work, or you can cut a slot or hole in the chassis motor mount tab.

            The Womp is a great start on a scratchbuild, as it gives you the rear motor axle cradle and the front axle and guide tongue, all in perfect perpendicularity, and ready to "build around".


            NYMODIFIEDS.COM

            Comment


            • 4424ever
              4424ever commented
              Editing a comment
              Modern era. Are you saying I’m old

            • Rastas
              Rastas commented
              Editing a comment
              We soldered the motor in ,as the screw's would come loose and end up on the track ,that's not good when commercial track racing! Just saying that scratch building anything is possible when mounting motors, and womps are easy to solder.
              John.

            • Vintage 1/24
              Vintage 1/24 commented
              Editing a comment
              4424ever: How old would you think you are if you didn’t know how old you were? That’s a good guideline I think.

              But yeah I think of the mini-cans as modern era stuff.


              Rastas: I just use the one screw when commercial racing, sometimes I dremel a slot on the right side mount and add a horizontal screw, and some of my competitors solder the motors in place.

              Not sure what kind of racing 6666hotrod is pursuing - but he did get an enthusiastic response. The Womp is a good basis for a custom or scratch built chassis.
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