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Bodies for Scratchbuilds, once Again !

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  • Bodies for Scratchbuilds, once Again !

    The Scratchbuilding Bug, has set in, with me ! I really enjoy doing it, and learning from it. I try to do my projects, so that they'll be legal, if I ever get the opportunity to run on a wood, Club track. But since all my running/racing, realistically, is on a home track, I will build some, my own experimental ways. As I live on a low-budget, fixed income, I can't allow my hobbies (I have another one), to get too deep into my pocket ! I have come up with a couple of ideas, to keep the slot car building, from messing up my budget. I like high-detail, hardbody cars, that can rival RTR cars. Ideally, need white kit bodies, or preferably a 1/32 model car kit body. Those model car kit bodies are somewhat few and far between, in 1/32 scale. I only intend to build a few, occasional projects this "shortcut" way, that I'm thinking up. Considering Resin, but two things I don't like : most of the prices, and all that extra work it takes, to make it look good ! My QUESTION : Can you experienced hobbyists, suggest how to make, clear, Lexan or PETG, bodies look at least passable ?? I won't be displaying these cars, alongside my regular slot car collection (which I'm pretty proud of). But I suspect some of them, can be made to look fairly decent, and not like cartoons ! Some good Tips, and some Photos, if possible, would be much appreciated. I also hear, that a clearcoat, floor gloss, or even "shoe-goo", will help keep the paint on these clear bodies (on the inside, of course). I'm investigating the clear-bodies idea, because there is great variety, and the cost is Really manageable !!

  • #2
    Would you consider these "passable" ??

    Cheers
    Chris Walker

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    • 6666hotrod
      6666hotrod
      Slot Car Enthusiast
      6666hotrod commented
      Editing a comment
      W O W !! ... THAT'S, What I'm Talkin' About !! You sure these were clear bodies, 😆 ?? Any tips, clues, or suggestions? And, who makes these Bodies ??

  • #3
    Show off!!! Chris' work is about the best I've seen.
    Matt B
    So. In
    Crashers

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    • #4
      Originally posted by mattb View Post
      Show off!!! Chris' work is about the best I've seen.
      DITTO
      TOM...HOME RACING GOO GOO!!!
      Warren, Ohio

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      • #5
        I remember those. I actually took notes about the technique you used from your excellent post about them.

        Comment


        • #6
          Chris' work shows clear Lexan bodies can be made to look great, but it's not easily done. I used to build some cars using Parma parts and bodies and found the Lexan bodies challenging to paint on the inside and turn out as desired. The money saved by their cost may end up not being a bargain given the amount of time involved.

          I'm retired too and understand having limited income. You might want to ask folks on HRW if they have spare bodies they'd be willing to sell at reasonable costs. What type of cars are you interested in?

          Comment


          • 6666hotrod
            6666hotrod
            Slot Car Enthusiast
            6666hotrod commented
            Editing a comment
            Thanks for your candor and understanding ! I am Interested, in a wide variety of the major racing series', cars. I don't think I'm skilled enough yet, to try to scratch build a sidewinder, so I'll get my F1, Le Mans Prototypes, Daytona Prototypes, from RTR manufacturer's such as Slot.It, Scalextric, Carrera, etc. I'll stick to scratch building Stock Cars, GT Cars, Touring Cars, that are suited to the inline motor layout. I'm gonna attempt a couple of Can Am cars, though : I may be able to modify a driver figure-tray, with enough room for an inline chassis layout. Maybe I WILL, ask around HRW, about some spare bodies, hobbyists would be willing to sell. P.S. : I WOULD, definitely, be interested in buying a RMS Resins CAMARO BODY (the Showdown car, which I call The Harry-Camaro) !! Would love to do a Trans Am fantasy car, with that body !
            6666hotrod
            Slot Car Enthusiast
            Last edited by 6666hotrod; January 11, 2022, 03:01 AM.

        • #7
          The two biggest thing in painting Lexan are:
          1) use paint for Lexan since it "grabs" but flexes
          2) the order of painting is a bit backwards.

          By order I mean you mask your windows and stripes on the inside, paint the main color, then spray the stripe last without re-masking (usually). That may be altered based on the colors and transparency, but usually when you look at the inside of the body, you would see the yellow overlaying the purple, for example.
          As long as you use paint for lexan, it won't crack and peel unless it's crashed hard. The detail parts are added later.

          PETG and butyrate are chemically different, so those rules don't apply to those materials. But yes, it takes a good sharp mold to make a clear body that is reasonable looking. They do exist.
          Come Race at The Trace!
          Timberline Trace International Raceway - SW of Mpls, MN
          https://www.thingiverse.com/chappyman66/designs

          Comment


          • chrisguyw
            chrisguyw
            HRW Forum Veteran
            chrisguyw commented
            Editing a comment
            And further to the "reverse order",.......if you want your decals to be protected by the body, they must be applied to the inside of the body first, before any paint.

        • #8
          Okay, dumb question...

          Couldn't you paint a Lexan body on the outside, like any injection-molded body? Does it have to be painted on the inside?

          Yes, it would make the paint more vulnerable, but no more at risk than on an injection-molded body. And it may look more realistic.

          As for making the paint 'grab', it would be possible to treat the outside of the Lexan prior to painting. Use something that would lightly etch the surface to help the paint bond. Wipe with acetone maybe?

          I wonder if anyone has tried this. And if so, how it worked out. Good or bad.

          A comment on Chris' work... The cars look so gorgeous that one completely overlooks the pretty obvious fasteners used to hold the body on. Not saying that is bad -- just interesting.
          HO RacePro
          HRW Forum Veteran
          Last edited by HO RacePro; January 11, 2022, 10:25 AM.
          Ed Bianchi
          York Pennsylvania USA

          Comment


          • #9
            Hmm...acetone on lexan may not end well.

            ​​​​​​...best keying the outside just as you would the inside with a fine scuffing pad.

            Also just to warn folks, some chemicals we put on our tyres will melt lexan, we learned that back in the lexan chassis days when carpet first started being used with uncoated foams. I'm talking 1/12 pan cars here. The chemicals actually melted the lexan chassis!
            Kevan - Isle of Man
            Print It, Build It, Race It, Improve It, Repeat...

            Comment


            • #10
              I have a local racer that does all the painting by brush and cheap hobby paint. Cars come out great and no issue . Just make sure you use flat paint on the inside.
              THE other Vancouver aka Vancouver Washington across the river from keep Portland weird....
              Member NASTE (Northwest Association of Slot Track Enthusiasts)

              Comment


              • Bal r 14
                Bal r 14
                HRW Forum Veteran
                Bal r 14 commented
                Editing a comment
                That's how I painted a lot of lexan bodies in the 60s. It was cheap, easy and held up well. Biggest issue with lexan was tearing around the mounting holes. I would add that it takes a great deal of effort and detailing to make a lexan body look like it isn't a lexan body.
                Bal r 14
                HRW Forum Veteran
                Last edited by Bal r 14; January 11, 2022, 05:14 PM.

              • chrisguyw
                chrisguyw
                HRW Forum Veteran
                chrisguyw commented
                Editing a comment
                Bal r 14,......just an FYI,.....in the 60's clear bodies were made of Butyrate, not Lexan,.....much more prone to tearing/splitting, and required different paint..

              • Bal r 14
                Bal r 14
                HRW Forum Veteran
                Bal r 14 commented
                Editing a comment
                Well, thanks. I didn't know that. Your memory is a lot better than mine.

            • #11
              Originally posted by HO RacePro View Post
              Okay, dumb question...

              Couldn't you paint a Lexan body on the outside, like any injection-molded body? Does it have to be painted on the inside?

              Yes, it would make the paint more vulnerable, but no more at risk than on an injection-molded body. And it may look more realistic.

              As for making the paint 'grab', it would be possible to treat the outside of the Lexan prior to painting. Use something that would lightly etch the surface to help the paint bond. Wipe with acetone maybe?

              I wonder if anyone has tried this. And if so, how it worked out. Good or bad.

              A comment on Chris' work... The cars look so gorgeous that one completely overlooks the pretty obvious fasteners used to hold the body on. Not saying that is bad -- just interesting.
              Ed,
              I have successfully painted the outside of my rc lexan bodies by :
              1.Wash body completely with Dawn dish soap and let dry.
              2. Give the body a light coat using Tamiya polycarbonate paint - should match or be close to color you are going to paint.
              You can then use automotive lacquer primer and paint to finish. Your mileage may vary with the thinner lexan.

              Dave

              Comment


              • #12
                Originally posted by HO RacePro View Post
                Okay, dumb question...

                Couldn't you paint a Lexan body on the outside, like any injection-molded body? Does it have to be painted on the inside?

                Yes, it would make the paint more vulnerable, but no more at risk than on an injection-molded body. And it may look more realistic.


                A comment on Chris' work... The cars look so gorgeous that one completely overlooks the pretty obvious fasteners used to hold the body on. Not saying that is bad -- just interesting.
                Not a dumb question at all Ed,.....in fact, many clear plastic bodies were painted on the outside (mainly by the club guys, not the commercial track guys) as they did tend to look more realistic, but, did suffer from more scratches/scrapes.

                Cheers
                Chris Walker

                Here are a couple of mid 60's clear "Butyrate" bodies that I did many years ago (Lexan was still a few years away), painted on the outside.

                FYI Butyrate needed to be painted with enamel only, and tended to split fairly easily, as well as "yellow" over time.

                (You can see that the windscreens have "yellowed").......Lexan and PETG do not do this.

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                chrisguyw
                HRW Forum Veteran
                Last edited by chrisguyw; January 13, 2022, 09:48 AM.

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