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Plastic end or can end driven, what’s the advantage? If any.

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  • Plastic end or can end driven, what’s the advantage? If any.

    On an s can motor what’s the advantage or difference using the can end to drive or the plastic end to drive from? I’ve seen it both ways.

  • #2
    My opinion is that can end mounting & drive is more secure than the plastic. Commercial racing went through the same dilemma back in the 60s & 70s. Can end won out there & is still used today.

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    • #3
      Can end has to be more rigid so must be favourite, endbell drive must have been invented by someone having a laugh
      Kevan - Isle of Man
      Print It, Build It, Race It, Improve It, Repeat...

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      • Michael Squier
        Michael Squier commented
        Editing a comment
        I saw it on a snap in fit plastic chassis with end bell to the rear, just wondered why they would do that. I will remember not to use one of those chassis for any future projects.

    • #4
      Originally posted by Michael Squier View Post
      On an s can motor what’s the advantage or difference using the can end to drive or the plastic end to drive from? I’ve seen it both ways.
      Michael, To be honest, for the motors that most of the plastic car folks use (relatively low torque/rpm) there is very little difference in either the can end drive, or, endbell drive. I prefer using motor screws on the can end which tends to stiffen up the motor box area, but, as long as your motor is either taped/glued/or screwed in it makes little difference.

      If you are playing with weight distribution, the can end of a motor is slightly heavier than the endbell end, as the magnets are situated towards the end of the can, so, can end vs. endbell drive can offer a slightly different weight distribution.

      As far as History goes,......at the peak of the slotcar craze (mid to late 60's) virtually all slotcar motors were secured by screws through the motor bracket and into the plastic endbell..........this changed in 1968(ish) when motors became stronger, and the practice of soldering the motor to the motor bracket became the norm.

      In the more modern world of plastic slot cars, Ninco, Fly, Scalextric. Slot-it etc. have all employed endbell drive configurations,..so,.....again,...if you glue/tape/screw your motor into position, the enbell vs. can orientation is of minor importance,......................I would not suggest you disregard any endbell drive chassis that you have.

      Cheers
      Chris Walker

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      • Michael Squier
        Michael Squier commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks for the detailed info. I will not be getting rid of any chassis, I don’t have enough yet.

    • #5
      Another advantage to can end drive is shorter wires to the guide in either IL or AW config.
      Kevan - Isle of Man
      Print It, Build It, Race It, Improve It, Repeat...

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      • #6
        Like Chris said....for home motors, doesn't matter.

        In the old days, some of the early endbells were a poor grade of plastic and rewound motors ran hotter, melting the endbell. That's part of what lead to can drive, but being able to stiffen the chassis by soldering the motor in was a major improvement.
        Come Race at The Trace!
        Timberline Trace International Raceway - SW of Mpls, MN
        https://www.thingiverse.com/chappyman66/designs

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        • Kevan
          Kevan commented
          Editing a comment
          The #1 reason for disliking endbell drive is the bearing is in plastic which isn't as solid as the can end bearing.

      • #7
        I remember doing hot rewinds and having problems with the plastic distorting. 48 turns of I forgot what wire gauge. You could burn through 5 or 6 motors a day.

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        • #8
          There is a self-centering bearing in the endbell, sometimes those are loose in the socket, so it is best to check for that problem. I have glued loose bearings in place with epoxy. The motors used in 1/24th commercial track cars are all can end drive. Often oilite bearings will need to be replaced. I have never had to replace the bearing in a 1/32nd car.

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          • #9
            I suspect the weight distribution is the most important consequence of how you orient the motor, endbell versus can. My preference is for more weight on the rear wheels, so I guess I'd favor can drive.

            Shorter wires help too. More about reduced weight than electrical resistance. Not as big a factor in 1/32nd as HO. In HO I've found it matters. I tie down the wires on my Rattler cars for a lower center of gravity. It makes a measurable difference.

            Something I believe is overlooked are the vibrations set up by the meshing of the gear teeth. My work with direct drive cars has made me aware of it. Slotcar gear tooth forms are often primitive, and result in the drivetrain getting whacked thousands of times per second. Shakes the whole car. Would the plastic of the endbell absorb some of that? And would that help? Or would the higher rigidity of the can be better?

            Actually better gears would be better. Spiral bevel gears anyone?

            So much fun spinning theories! Too bad there's so little clean data to evaluate them.

            Ed Bianchi
            Ed Bianchi
            York Pennsylvania USA

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            • #10
              Spiral bevel gears absolutely no thank you
              Dave
              Peterborough Ont
              CANADA

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