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RESIN Bodies: Do's n' Dont's?

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  • RESIN Bodies: Do's n' Dont's?

    Didn't know where to place this, so I'll put it here.

    I'm new to working with resin bodies. I haven't a clue about them. So, I thought I'd start a thread where the info can gather in one place for not only me, but any others wondering the same things. Here goes!

    * What adhesive to reattach parts? I have an old Smilin' Ray '57 Ford, and the front window posts have fractured. What do I need to use to secure and reinforce the joint?

    * What adhesive to use to attach styrene mounting posts/etc to the understide of a resin body?

    It's time for me to get serious about the three resin bodies I currently have on hand, and expect more in the future. Thanks for any input!

    All fer now!

    Andre
    Andre Ming
    Poteau, OK

  • #2
    I had a resin body I was going to build a chassis for but I dropped it on the cement floor and it broke in about 5 pieces. I glued it back together with Locktite 380. I hope your resin bodies are more durable.

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    • Fathead59
      Fathead59
      HRW Forum Veteran
      Fathead59 commented
      Editing a comment
      I know how you feel , I had bought a few of bodies from RMS resins before he stopped making because of becoming allergic to the resin . I accidentally knocked one off the table and it broke into two peices . But I was able to order a replacement one

  • #3
    Thanks for some input Bal.

    Locktite 380 is some expensive stuff, I'll say!

    As for durable: Well, the Smilin' Ray '57 body has already got two window posts broke, and it hasn't made a race yet. In fact, it hasn't even been mounted to a chassis yet! I can't help but feel that it being 10+ years old hasn't helped.

    So, yes, "durable" will be a necessity for the rough and tumble environment my oval cars live in. All of the Carrera '57 cars have a part or two being held on with tacky putty!

    At this point, I'm thinking about trying E6000 on the posts. In other applications, E6000 seems to hold good, but remains a bit flexible. I think the ability to flex a bit might be a good thing?

    In fact, I think I'll run out there to my hobby building and glue one side with E6000 and see what happens?

    Andre

    EDIT: Make that E6000, not E1000. 🙄
    LAMing
    HRW Forum Veteran
    Last edited by LAMing; October 8, 2021, 03:58 PM.
    Andre Ming
    Poteau, OK

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    • #4
      E6000 will work on resin. But, it won't bond well to poly plastics if you are going to use that for reinforcements. It will work for awhile, but will separate with any kind of stress. Loctite 380 is expensive, but a one oz bottle lasts for about a year in the refrigerator and you don't use much at a time. You might try Loctite 480.
      Bal r 14
      HRW Forum Veteran
      Last edited by Bal r 14; October 8, 2021, 05:09 PM.

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      • #5
        I just use CYA to fix cracks/breaks.
        For body posts I use 5 min epoxy or JB Weld on resin.

        The CYA works fine for body posts on printed bodies but they are porous unlike resin.
        Come Race at The Trace!
        Timberline Trace International Raceway - SW of Mpls, MN
        https://www.thingiverse.com/chappyman66/designs

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        • Bal r 14
          Bal r 14
          HRW Forum Veteran
          Bal r 14 commented
          Editing a comment
          I use 5 minute epoxy and JB weld for areas I want to strengthen. But, it takes a lot of time to set and is kind of runny until then.

      • #6
        For mounting body posts, I initially glue them in place with super glue and once this is secure I 'paint' the area where it is mounted and the bottom of the post with superglue and then just use epoxy resin as it seems to create a stronger joint. Also a bit of bracing around the bottom of the post works well.

        Click image for larger version

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        Depending on where the break is on the windscreen pillar superglue works well and may be able to be reinforced by supergluing tissue paper in behind it.

        This link might be of some use - Help with cracked resin body repairs - HRW (hrwforum.com)
        Bram,
        CHCH NZ

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        • Bal r 14
          Bal r 14
          HRW Forum Veteran
          Bal r 14 commented
          Editing a comment
          Using baking soda for filler, as mentioned in that link, works quite well. But, you need a really runny super glue.

      • #7
        Thanks all! Once the E6000 has had time to finish curing, I'll test it to see how well it did. If it's a bust, then y'all have given me some more things to try. FWIW: I roughed up the surfaces to be joined by scratching with a small file in an effort to give some "tooth" for the E6000 to grab a hold of.

        Wobble: Yes, that's what I had in mind for mounting posts. I don't like making angle braces (time consuming to file the angles/contours to fit) but they do produce a strong post.

        As for my E6000 attempt: We shall see here in a bit!

        Andre
        Andre Ming
        Poteau, OK

        Comment


        • Wobble
          Wobble
          HRW Forum Veteran
          Wobble commented
          Editing a comment
          File to fit? never, I simply allow the epoxy to fill any gaps and have never had one fail.

        • LAMing
          LAMing
          HRW Forum Veteran
          LAMing commented
          Editing a comment
          Well, that was back in the 1990s and it was styrene static kit hard bodies I was converting to slot car use! I was using liquid cement so the fit had to be good. Very little "filling" ability of liquid cement. Sure made a strong post when finished.

      • #8
        I wonder how much weight would be added if you were to use shoe goo and mesh tape to keep the resin bodies from breaking

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      • #9
        I used original gorilla glue (expanding foam) to reinforce my RC planes bodies and wings. I used cardboard forms and modeling clay to shape where I wanted it to go. It was very effective and weighs almost nothing. It is easy to carve out areas you want to be hollow, but you mustn't wait until it gets too hard. It should really quiet down gear noise, too.

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        • #10
          ShoeGoo smeared inside will hold it together unless you drive like a doofus...I used to use it on 1/12th rc pan car bodyshells and if it holds them together then a slot car body should last YEARS.
          Kevan - Isle of Man
          Print It, Build It, Race It, Improve It, Repeat...

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          • LAMing
            LAMing
            HRW Forum Veteran
            LAMing commented
            Editing a comment
            Kevan said: "ShoeGoo smeared inside will hold it together unless you drive like a doofus..."

            Hey, i resemble that remark! Actually, my form of 1/32 oval racing is a bit different. It's results in a pretty rough and tumble environment. :-)

          • Fathead59
            Fathead59
            HRW Forum Veteran
            Fathead59 commented
            Editing a comment
            I though Chicago was the only place people drive like a doofus , at least they do during rush hour

          • Brumos RSR
            Brumos RSR
            HRW Forum Veteran
            Brumos RSR commented
            Editing a comment
            When we lived there you had to counter act against the other drivers and know over time which lanes typically moved best and at what exits on the Kennedy to move ahead.

        • #11
          For reinforcing repairs I use steri-strip 1/4” wound closure tape covered with superglue or 5min. epoxy. The strips are permeable and allow adhesive to penetrate and form a sort-of fiberglass . Most drug stores carry them in the first aid section.
          Mike V.
          Western North Carolina

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          • #12
            That was what I was going to do with the shoe goo , smear the shoe goo on the inside of the body and place the mesh strips on top of the shoe goo , or maybe duct tape ? It was only a thought

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            • #13
              The first thing to do is to wash the body with a good dish detergent that is cheap. You don't want one with skin softeners and stuff in it, just plain soap. Next I use an SOS pad to clean and scratch up the surface. That gets a body ready to wet sand for paint.

              For inner re-inforcement, the first thing to do is sand the resin with coarse sandpaper. Without that your epoxy won't get a solid grip on the resin. I haven't had much issue with resin breaking unless a car is run off on the floor. You can paint some epoxy inside a body and cut some drywall cloth to lay in it or you can use a hot glue gun, but you need to use low temp glue sticks.

              Sanding the resin before you glue is the best way to have it hold.

              Single mount posts without re-inforcing gussets are easy to break loose. You can cut gussets from any plain plastic with a pair of scissors. They don't have to be pretty if you just do it to please yourself. 2-4 will do the job and epoxy can be loaded on all surfaces.
              Matt B
              So. In
              Crashers

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              • #14
                I was thinking of gluing a thin washers to the base of the mounting post , putting a little strength around there . Thinking that could be the weakest spot . Maybe even seeing if you could put a sleeve around the post that will not add to much weight to the body

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                • #15
                  Coming back to this thread and reading the last few posts my thought is 'blimey you guys must crash a lot'...then I look at the thread subject to remind me it's about resin bodyshells
                  Kevan - Isle of Man
                  Print It, Build It, Race It, Improve It, Repeat...

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