Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Newbie starting w/ Policar set(s)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Newbie starting w/ Policar set(s)

    Greetings HRW,

    First off, thanks to Dave, Harry & others (Travis @ That Slotcar Guy). Wife purchased me the newer Policar BRZ drift set & expansion set (4 more straights + 8 more R1 curves) for father's day. I'm stoked to say the least. I watched Harry and Dave's coverage of the set and think it's the best bet for me and my little kiddos especially with the adjustable power supply. I'm also in the process of offloading some other older hobby assets collecting dust in the garage to free up some funds to pickup the following:

    Policar set from Professor Motor w/ the Scalextric Ford & Ferrari, a 4 pack of the small straights and one pack of the R2 45 deg curves.

    I could use some assistance in feedback. I'm contemplating picking up two aftermarket controllers from Professor Motor as well but am confused as to the exact differences between their 35 Ohm vs Electronic control for my Policar set. Could someone explain the difference between an electronic control vs resistor design?

    Also, here's my proposed layout I'm considering. Put it together with Ultimate Racer 3.0 - track length comes out just about even, and I'm planning on employing Nils' idea of using foam tape (from McMaster Carr) for borders, mounted on top of foam core board for somewhat easier storage and ability to do some landscaping.

    I've already got a 4'x8' table in my office area, with a computer monitor mounted off the side and area for my keyboard. Going to loop the right side of the track through some cabling for my work station and then extend the table into a "L". Not sure how-to display my plan correctly, but the right portion will be elevated and will drop down through the corkscrew compared to what is displayed.

    As mentioned, open to any and all feedback! Looking forward to getting involved in the community and reliving some of my fond memories as a kid racing slots with my kids.

    Jonathan

  • #2
    Looks like a complicated track for beginners. Not much fun for cars to come off at every corner or every lap. Good way to lose interest.
    Matt B
    So. In
    Crashers

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by mattb View Post
      Looks like a complicated track for beginners. Not much fun for cars to come off at every corner or every lap. Good way to lose interest.
      Good call. Likely will start off without all the twists/corkscrew, as I'll still have 4 extra straights. Was just trying to maximize all the curves I've got and try and get both lanes equidistant. Will admit though, it's hard to tell just theory crafting on Racer 3.0 without having it in person.

      Only nice thing about the policar set is the adjustable power base, so will start with it turned down quite a bit to help w/ the power.

      Here's another theory crafted idea... if in practice the hump on the top long straight proves difficult, I'll just take that out.
      Attached Files
      Last edited by jfuente; June 22, 2021, 05:44 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Almost thinking for starting out, maybe just got for a figure eight style track - track lengths identical and would just need another pack of R2 45deg curves. Then maybe branch out from there.

        Still curious about the difference between the Professor Motor 35 ohm vs electronic controllers.
        Attached Files

        Comment


        • #5
          Just starting out with L shape would do the trick. That L shape you have would be good, but just take out those wiggles. On that end, maybe go with Indy style turns and keep the narrow turn at the other end. That wouldn’t be too difficult and allow you to get a feel……then move on from there. Just my

          Comment


          • jfuente
            jfuente commented
            Editing a comment
            Noted! I think like Mattb mentions below, you're almost just trying to include all the curves because ya got them. Going back to the drawing board as I type.

        • #6
          Welcome aboard JF and enjoy the ride...good luck with the new set and layout!!!!
          TOM...HOME RACING GOO GOO!!!
          Warren, Ohio

          Comment


          • jfuente
            jfuente commented
            Editing a comment
            Cheers! Looking forward to joining in all the great content.

        • #7
          About the controllers
          the resistor based (35 ohm ) is a good controller however it will react to different cars differently depending on motor, traction magnets power supply etc etc
          an electronic controller operates on the principle of increasing voltage to the track and is much smoother and more efficient at it where the resistance controller limits the power through the resistor
          If someone gave you both to try at the same time the resistor controller would end up in a drawer. I would spend my money on the electronic controller. I currently have 6 of them
          Dave
          Peterborough Ont
          CANADA

          Comment


          • jfuente
            jfuente commented
            Editing a comment
            Good to know! Maybe I'll just pickup one electronic for myself and let the kiddos use the stock ones. Appreciate the input!

        • #8
          A simple track plan is not bad at all. Consider the figure 8 being folded onto an L shaped platform. Even a basic flat L is not a bad design. Bad thing about expander track sets is they all contain extra curves which you usually don't need and trying to use them just to use them, doesn't equate to a good track design. Just buying a few extra straights is usually a better idea. Good thing about plastic is you can start with something simple and change it in the future.

          If yo buy electronic controllers you have to choose negative or positive polarity (depends on how the track is wired). The controllers only work with that type of track wiring,. I think the Policar is positive polarity, but I am not sure. Most race sets are negative. Might stick with stock controllers and consider a change later.
          Matt B
          So. In
          Crashers

          Comment


          • jfuente
            jfuente commented
            Editing a comment
            I believe Professor Motors has a set specifically for the Policar track. Based on 4424ever's feedback, I'm going to just pickup one electronic for myself and see how it goes. My kids can just use the stock controllers for the time being. They won't mind.

            And you're spot on about track design. I was simply trying to include all the pieces... honestly I think with a cleaner track design I might actually save a bit instead of going for more curves. Back at the drawing board now. Might even see about branching off my table into a T and see what I can come up with.

        • #9
          Ok, took all the suggestions and bumped out my table into a T. Here's my updated design. Nice long backstretch (will be longer, but the single packs of straights are sold out at LEB & ProfMotors), two diff radius sweepers, two tight hairpins on each end of the backstretch and something to fit under the computer monitor area at the end.

          Also made a 4th version, trying to get an even wider sweeper in, this one is nice as it'd only use 8 straights so I'd avoid needing to get a second set and could just get a few more wide radius curves...

          Only other thought would be to get a long backstretch with a figure 8 in the middle, tried it but getting some weird geometry with the pieces and coming up at an odd angle.

          Input welcome!
          Attached Files
          Last edited by jfuente; June 23, 2021, 01:03 AM.

          Comment


          • #10
            Some form of figure 8 is the best way to equalize lane distance. Unusually shaped tables can mean lots of time spent retrieving cars that go off the track.

            Comment


            • #11
              Any controller works by dropping the track voltage. In the case of a resistor controller those drop voltage in proportion to the current that the cars use. Different cars can use more or less current so the controller will feel different depending on what car you are running. Resistor controllers work best if they are matched to the car, if there is a big mismatch your control will suffer. If the ohm value is too high you will have to pull the trigger a lot just to get the car moving and will only have a limited amount of usable trigger travel. If the ohm value is too low the car will want to go too fast with the trigger at the start of its throw. The power supply voltage also comes into play. Electronic controllers operate on a different principle, they also have resistors, but those are used to control a transistor and the current that goes to the car does not go through them. More sophisticated electronic controllers have a sensitivity and brake control. In many cases once you have found the best settings for those they will work with all of your cars. The Slot.it controllers have a lot of possible settings, that is good and bad because some people are never able to find the perfect combination.
              One thing to be aware of with electronic controllers is that they are sensitive to how your track is wired. There are two ways to wire a track and the real difference between them is the direction that current will go through the controller. Resistors can conduct electricity in either direction, but transistor devices are directional. Most 1/32nd scale sets use what is called negative polarity, while club type tracks are almost all positive polarity. Policar tracks are the only ones that are positive polarity. If you are going to order an electronic controller be sure that it will work with positive polarity.

              Comment


              • jfuente
                jfuente commented
                Editing a comment
                Thanks for the explanation! I think I'll rock the stock controllers for a bit, as suggested above, and then decide how I wish to proceed.

            • #12
              Ok! Final attempt at a more simplistic design. Back stretch, two hairpin turns, with the figure 8 laid out on the main table.
              Attached Files

              Comment


              • Bal r 14
                Bal r 14 commented
                Editing a comment
                It is well balanced and very equal, but I think you would get bored with it fairly soon.

              • jfuente
                jfuente commented
                Editing a comment
                Any suggestions? Trying to balance some challenge yet fit it into my current space, without cramming in so many curves into it so cars continually fly off.

            • #13
              Changed the section up a bit... this makes me appreciate well laid out tracks a lot more! They always look simple at first glance, before ya try and sit down and work something up. My long term plan will include rearranging my room to give me a bit more space, but just trying to get up and started with something.

              I figure a starter track is better than no track.
              Attached Files

              Comment


              • #14
                Originally posted by jfuente View Post
                Changed the section up a bit... this makes me appreciate well laid out tracks a lot more! They always look simple at first glance, before ya try and sit down and work something up. My long term plan will include rearranging my room to give me a bit more space, but just trying to get up and started with something.

                I figure a starter track is better than no track.
                You’ve some interesting ideas. For this one, not a fan of any kind of kink or curve right before, under, or right after an overpass. Nothing that adds to the potential for deslotting under the overpass or in a blind spot they inevitably create.

                Comment


                • #15
                  Originally posted by 4380r View Post

                  You’ve some interesting ideas. For this one, not a fan of any kind of kink or curve right before, under, or right after an overpass. Nothing that adds to the potential for deslotting under the overpass or in a blind spot they inevitably create.
                  Great feedback! I'll admit, I'm very new to this, finding track design challenging (obvious w/ my efforts). Just trying to put my preliminary work in on design prior to purchasing more track.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X
                  UA-149438709-1